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  • Having attacked the late former PM earlier for being corrupt and having used the services of the Navy for a personal vacation, PM Modi paid a tribute to Rajiv Gandhi on the occasion of his 28th death anniversary. 
Read more on www.firstpost.com

#narendramodi #bjp #tribute #rajivgandhi #deathanniversary
  • Having attacked the late former PM earlier for being corrupt and having used the services of the Navy for a personal vacation, PM Modi paid a tribute to Rajiv Gandhi on the occasion of his 28th death anniversary.
    Read more on www.firstpost.com

    #narendramodi #bjp #tribute #rajivgandhi #deathanniversary
  • 625 8 22 hours ago
  • #FirstpostClicks
Five years and countless protests and petitions later, Mumbai’s widely contested coastal road project has hit the pause button, albeit tentatively. Earlier in April this year, the Bombay High Court ordered a stay on the reclamation of the coastline by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), thereby stopping the construction of the 10-kilometre-long section of the planned coastal road until 3 June. For the first phase of the project alone, involving the construction of the south section — from Nariman Point to Worli — the BMC will have to shell out Rs 12,700 crores. The enterprise is said to be one of the largest ever undertaken by the civic body. It aims to divert the congestion on the city’s roads and provide an alternative for the bustling Western Express Highway by erecting a 35-kilometre-long arterial road.

Overshadowed by the needs of a thriving metropolis, the vibrant aquatic life found within this shoreline is threatened by the encroaching concrete jungle. Its fauna includes rare varieties of corals, sea slugs, and fish, among other creatures. It is also the sole source of livelihood for a community of artisanal fishermen, whose catch largely comprises fish and crabs found in the intertidal pools. In order to document the changing face of the city, several photographers have been capturing the work-in-progress along the coastal strip of Mumbai. The alarming pace of the construction prompted them to urgently highlight the species flourishing in the city’s seabed.

#mumbai #coastalroad #marinelife #aquaticanimals #seabed #ocean #trafficproblems
  • #FirstpostClicks
    Five years and countless protests and petitions later, Mumbai’s widely contested coastal road project has hit the pause button, albeit tentatively. Earlier in April this year, the Bombay High Court ordered a stay on the reclamation of the coastline by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), thereby stopping the construction of the 10-kilometre-long section of the planned coastal road until 3 June. For the first phase of the project alone, involving the construction of the south section — from Nariman Point to Worli — the BMC will have to shell out Rs 12,700 crores. The enterprise is said to be one of the largest ever undertaken by the civic body. It aims to divert the congestion on the city’s roads and provide an alternative for the bustling Western Express Highway by erecting a 35-kilometre-long arterial road.

    Overshadowed by the needs of a thriving metropolis, the vibrant aquatic life found within this shoreline is threatened by the encroaching concrete jungle. Its fauna includes rare varieties of corals, sea slugs, and fish, among other creatures. It is also the sole source of livelihood for a community of artisanal fishermen, whose catch largely comprises fish and crabs found in the intertidal pools. In order to document the changing face of the city, several photographers have been capturing the work-in-progress along the coastal strip of Mumbai. The alarming pace of the construction prompted them to urgently highlight the species flourishing in the city’s seabed.

    #mumbai #coastalroad #marinelife #aquaticanimals #seabed #ocean #trafficproblems
  • 405 5 23 hours ago
  • To keep the entertainment quotient of ICC World Cup going, almost every edition throws at us some unexpected surprises where a perceived minnow plays out of its skin to land a deadly punch on the heavyweight it finds itself pitted against. There have been occasions where such unexpected victories have resulted in the complete transformation of the cricketing landscape in the country. The cases of India and Bangladesh would serve as the ideal examples of such a transformation.

Here, we take a look at the biggest upsets in the 44-year journey of Cricket World Cup.

#icccricketworldcup2019 #cricketworldcup #cricket #India #upsets
  • To keep the entertainment quotient of ICC World Cup going, almost every edition throws at us some unexpected surprises where a perceived minnow plays out of its skin to land a deadly punch on the heavyweight it finds itself pitted against. There have been occasions where such unexpected victories have resulted in the complete transformation of the cricketing landscape in the country. The cases of India and Bangladesh would serve as the ideal examples of such a transformation.

    Here, we take a look at the biggest upsets in the 44-year journey of Cricket World Cup.

    #icccricketworldcup2019 #cricketworldcup #cricket #India #upsets
  • 47 1 21 May, 2019
  • Firstpost presents #HumansOfElections.

As the polling for Lok Sabha Election 2019 comes to an end, we continue to look at the stories of people that kept the democracy going over the last month.

Teresa Nongthombam, a 17-year-old cadet from the National Cadet Corps (NCC) jumped at the opportunity of serving senior citizens and people with disabilities during the Lok Sabha polls as a volunteer because she felt she could "serve the nation that way." Teresa, who recently appeared for her Class 11 exam from Ananda Singh Higher Secondary School in Imphal didn't think twice while offering to serve as a volunteer when her mother, a government primary school teacher appointed as a booth level officer, informed her that she was looking for young volunteers below 18 years to assist the elderly and differently-abled voters on the day of election.

Teresa said, "I just felt like helping the elderly and differently-abled voters when my mother asked if I would be interested. I was extremely happy when I assisted elderly voters like my grandmother by holding their hands and guiding them inside the polling station.” Teresa added that as an NCC cadet, she has always wanted to serve the nation. Therefore, she looked towards serving people in this manner when she was given an opportunity.

Courtesy: Armstrong Chanambam, @101_reporters
  • Firstpost presents #HumansOfElections .

    As the polling for Lok Sabha Election 2019 comes to an end, we continue to look at the stories of people that kept the democracy going over the last month.

    Teresa Nongthombam, a 17-year-old cadet from the National Cadet Corps (NCC) jumped at the opportunity of serving senior citizens and people with disabilities during the Lok Sabha polls as a volunteer because she felt she could "serve the nation that way." Teresa, who recently appeared for her Class 11 exam from Ananda Singh Higher Secondary School in Imphal didn't think twice while offering to serve as a volunteer when her mother, a government primary school teacher appointed as a booth level officer, informed her that she was looking for young volunteers below 18 years to assist the elderly and differently-abled voters on the day of election.

    Teresa said, "I just felt like helping the elderly and differently-abled voters when my mother asked if I would be interested. I was extremely happy when I assisted elderly voters like my grandmother by holding their hands and guiding them inside the polling station.” Teresa added that as an NCC cadet, she has always wanted to serve the nation. Therefore, she looked towards serving people in this manner when she was given an opportunity.

    Courtesy: Armstrong Chanambam, @101_reporters
  • 128 1 21 May, 2019
  • #FirstpostClicks | It's a heady riot of colours and aromas from the moment you step in, and yet, you can’t possibly miss its old world charm, dating back to a black-and-white time. Tucked away in the shadows of Kolkata’s biggest mosque — Nakhoda Masjid, Zakaria Street is the lesser known cousin of Delhi’s Chandni Chowk, Mumbai’s Mohammad Ali Road, and Hyderabad’s old quarters.

For Zakaria Street, the magic lies in its almost tangible smellscape, especially in the month of Ramzan, when the lanes are awash with food for the gods. On Zakaria Street, the carnival commences soon after Shab-e-Barat, or the day of forgiveness for one’s sins in the Islamic calendar. The neighbourhood, along with the adjoining Kolutola Market, Phears Lane, Chitpur and Rabindra Sarani, form the erstwhile colonial ‘Black Town’, with its ‘White’ counterpart in Dalhousie Square (renamed BBD Baag). While the ‘Black Town’ housed natives, the ‘White Town’ doubled up as political and bureaucratic corridors for the British.

Modernities overlying the remains of the red brick architecture in the area is a palimpsest of the past that boasts of the ‘Jorasanko’ home of Tagore, the ‘Salim Manzil’ residence of Gauhar Jaan, and the home of Raja Rammohan Roy, among others. The "cultural capital of India" might just have been birthed in the vicinity of these alleys, of which Zakaria Street continues to receive generations of loyalists, who find their way back to it in search of familiar flavours this time of the year. Shahwar Kibra's text and Tanumay Naskar's photos offer a glimpse.

#kolkata #ramzan #culture #religion #festival #festivalsofindia #india
  • #FirstpostClicks | It's a heady riot of colours and aromas from the moment you step in, and yet, you can’t possibly miss its old world charm, dating back to a black-and-white time. Tucked away in the shadows of Kolkata’s biggest mosque — Nakhoda Masjid, Zakaria Street is the lesser known cousin of Delhi’s Chandni Chowk, Mumbai’s Mohammad Ali Road, and Hyderabad’s old quarters.

    For Zakaria Street, the magic lies in its almost tangible smellscape, especially in the month of Ramzan, when the lanes are awash with food for the gods. On Zakaria Street, the carnival commences soon after Shab-e-Barat, or the day of forgiveness for one’s sins in the Islamic calendar. The neighbourhood, along with the adjoining Kolutola Market, Phears Lane, Chitpur and Rabindra Sarani, form the erstwhile colonial ‘Black Town’, with its ‘White’ counterpart in Dalhousie Square (renamed BBD Baag). While the ‘Black Town’ housed natives, the ‘White Town’ doubled up as political and bureaucratic corridors for the British.

    Modernities overlying the remains of the red brick architecture in the area is a palimpsest of the past that boasts of the ‘Jorasanko’ home of Tagore, the ‘Salim Manzil’ residence of Gauhar Jaan, and the home of Raja Rammohan Roy, among others. The "cultural capital of India" might just have been birthed in the vicinity of these alleys, of which Zakaria Street continues to receive generations of loyalists, who find their way back to it in search of familiar flavours this time of the year. Shahwar Kibra's text and Tanumay Naskar's photos offer a glimpse.

    #kolkata #ramzan #culture #religion #festival #festivalsofindia #india
  • 243 0 20 May, 2019
  • News networks across India work in collaboration with exit poll agencies to estimate the numbers each party is bound to get, by asking voters who they voted for as they exit from the polling booth. With the official results still 3 days away, here’s what all the exit polls show.

Read more: www.firstpost.com

#exitpoll #elections2019 #bjp #congress #alliance #voters #survey #news18india #nielsen #neta
  • News networks across India work in collaboration with exit poll agencies to estimate the numbers each party is bound to get, by asking voters who they voted for as they exit from the polling booth. With the official results still 3 days away, here’s what all the exit polls show.

    Read more: www.firstpost.com

    #exitpoll #elections2019 #bjp #congress #alliance #voters #survey #news18india #nielsen #neta
  • 367 4 20 May, 2019
  • #FirstpostClicks 
Odissi is a source of endless beauty and wonder. From its stunning sun motif costume, to its curvaceous, graceful movements — that swaying torso which miraculously avoids the obscene, that tribhanga and the chaukha, langorous music, the resonant pakhawaj, with Krishna’s love and worship of Jagannatha at its heart, Odissi is beautiful.

It evokes wonder and teases the mind – male dancers swaying their torsos and necks in delicate feminine movements, female dancers swirling around to come back to the chaukha, their legs and arms spread out to form a square, a very masculine posture. It all fits; male, female, grace, vigour, delicacy, strength all co-exist without jostling for space. Equally wondrous is the music – names of many of its ragas and talas are found in Carnatic music: Sankarabharanam, Mukhari, Chakravakam, (not Ahir Bhairav), Triputa tala, Eka tala. They are however rendered in a style closer to Hindustani music.

Odissi is a young dance form, though it has assimilated and is born of ancient temple dance traditions, music, poetry, and devotion to Jagannatha. Reinventing itself as a classical dance form of India, it has a repertoire of pure dance as well as of abhinaya. A transnational production displays the dance form's synergy between male and female elements, writes Dr Lakshmi Sreeram, a Carnatic and Hindustani musician and researcher.

Read more: www.firstpost.com

#odissi #odissidance #culture #motif #costume #hindustani #classicaldance #posture #feminine #carnaticmusic #odissa #indianpride
  • #FirstpostClicks
    Odissi is a source of endless beauty and wonder. From its stunning sun motif costume, to its curvaceous, graceful movements — that swaying torso which miraculously avoids the obscene, that tribhanga and the chaukha, langorous music, the resonant pakhawaj, with Krishna’s love and worship of Jagannatha at its heart, Odissi is beautiful.

    It evokes wonder and teases the mind – male dancers swaying their torsos and necks in delicate feminine movements, female dancers swirling around to come back to the chaukha, their legs and arms spread out to form a square, a very masculine posture. It all fits; male, female, grace, vigour, delicacy, strength all co-exist without jostling for space. Equally wondrous is the music – names of many of its ragas and talas are found in Carnatic music: Sankarabharanam, Mukhari, Chakravakam, (not Ahir Bhairav), Triputa tala, Eka tala. They are however rendered in a style closer to Hindustani music.

    Odissi is a young dance form, though it has assimilated and is born of ancient temple dance traditions, music, poetry, and devotion to Jagannatha. Reinventing itself as a classical dance form of India, it has a repertoire of pure dance as well as of abhinaya. A transnational production displays the dance form's synergy between male and female elements, writes Dr Lakshmi Sreeram, a Carnatic and Hindustani musician and researcher.

    Read more: www.firstpost.com

    #odissi #odissidance #culture #motif #costume #hindustani #classicaldance #posture #feminine #carnaticmusic #odissa #indianpride
  • 170 2 20 May, 2019