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  • The triangular plot of land at the intersection of Broadway and 5th Avenue at 23rd Street, c. 1890. The area just to the north was designated as a public space in 1686, and it briefly served as a #pottersfield. A large plot, stretching from 23rd Street to 34th Street between 3rd and 7th Avenues, was reserved as a parade ground when the city #grid was laid out. This location was far from the city, as well as adjacent to a federal arsenal. Soldiers practiced maneuvers here during the #Warof1812, and in 1814 it was named after President James Madison. In 1828, the city reduced the parade ground to 90 acres, and it was landscaped and opened as a public #park in 1847. An old farmhouse across the Bloomingdale Road, known as the Madison Cottage, became a popular roadside attraction, serving as the last stop for stagecoaches before they continued north. The Cottage was demolished in 1852 to make way for Franconi's Hippodrome, an arena that hosted jousting tournaments and chariot races. It only lasted two seasons before closing. In 1857, dry-goods magnate and #realestate speculator Amos Eno bought the Hippodrome and razed it, building the luxurious #FifthAvenue Hotel. Initially derided as "Eno's Folly," as it was thought to be too far #uptown, it was actually a wildly successful establishment. Eno also bought the small triangle of land, known as the "flatiron" after its distinctive shape. He built an apartment house and several commercial buildings on the plot, leasing space to advertisers on the side of the apartment house. In the 1870s, he also set up a canvas screen and projected "magic lantern" slides onto it, alternating pictures, news, and ads. The screen could be seen from the park and nearby streets, and folks flocked to the area to see it. After Eno died, the plot was sold to the George Fuller Company, which hired Daniel Burnham to build a new headquarters. Adhering to the size of the narrow plot, it was quickly nicknamed the #FlatironBuilding. When it first opened in 1902, people were concerned that a strong gust of wind would topple it! #NYC #MadisonSquarePark #Flatiron #Broadway #TBT #iconic #advertising #architecture #history #NYChistory #DiscoveringNYC
  • The triangular plot of land at the intersection of Broadway and 5th Avenue at 23rd Street, c. 1890. The area just to the north was designated as a public space in 1686, and it briefly served as a #pottersfield . A large plot, stretching from 23rd Street to 34th Street between 3rd and 7th Avenues, was reserved as a parade ground when the city #grid was laid out. This location was far from the city, as well as adjacent to a federal arsenal. Soldiers practiced maneuvers here during the #Warof1812 , and in 1814 it was named after President James Madison. In 1828, the city reduced the parade ground to 90 acres, and it was landscaped and opened as a public #park in 1847. An old farmhouse across the Bloomingdale Road, known as the Madison Cottage, became a popular roadside attraction, serving as the last stop for stagecoaches before they continued north. The Cottage was demolished in 1852 to make way for Franconi's Hippodrome, an arena that hosted jousting tournaments and chariot races. It only lasted two seasons before closing. In 1857, dry-goods magnate and #realestate speculator Amos Eno bought the Hippodrome and razed it, building the luxurious #FifthAvenue Hotel. Initially derided as "Eno's Folly," as it was thought to be too far #uptown , it was actually a wildly successful establishment. Eno also bought the small triangle of land, known as the "flatiron" after its distinctive shape. He built an apartment house and several commercial buildings on the plot, leasing space to advertisers on the side of the apartment house. In the 1870s, he also set up a canvas screen and projected "magic lantern" slides onto it, alternating pictures, news, and ads. The screen could be seen from the park and nearby streets, and folks flocked to the area to see it. After Eno died, the plot was sold to the George Fuller Company, which hired Daniel Burnham to build a new headquarters. Adhering to the size of the narrow plot, it was quickly nicknamed the #FlatironBuilding . When it first opened in 1902, people were concerned that a strong gust of wind would topple it! #NYC #MadisonSquarePark #Flatiron #Broadway #TBT #iconic #advertising #architecture #history #NYChistory #DiscoveringNYC
  • 650 24 7 March, 2019