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  • The Navajo name for Lower Antelope Canyon is Hazdistazí
(called "Hasdestwazi" by the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department), or 'spiral rock arches'. Lower Antelope Canyon is in the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation. The canyon is accessible by guided tour only.
  • The Navajo name for Lower Antelope Canyon is Hazdistazí
    (called "Hasdestwazi" by the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department), or 'spiral rock arches'. Lower Antelope Canyon is in the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation. The canyon is accessible by guided tour only.
  • 526 14 24 June, 2019
  • TBT back to my triathlon and marathon days. A huge amount of suffering went into training for the Ironman and Chicago marathon.
  • TBT back to my triathlon and marathon days. A huge amount of suffering went into training for the Ironman and Chicago marathon.
  • 237 7 3 hours ago
  • Antelope Canyon was formed by erosion of Navajo Sandstone, primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes. 
Rainwater, especially during monsoon season, runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic "flowing" shapes in the rock.

Flooding in the canyon still occurs. A flood occurred on October 30, 2006, that lasted 36 hours, and caused the Tribal Park Authorities to close Lower Antelope Canyon for five months.
  • Antelope Canyon was formed by erosion of Navajo Sandstone, primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes.
    Rainwater, especially during monsoon season, runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic "flowing" shapes in the rock.

    Flooding in the canyon still occurs. A flood occurred on October 30, 2006, that lasted 36 hours, and caused the Tribal Park Authorities to close Lower Antelope Canyon for five months.
  • 527 8 25 June, 2019
  • "Should I post this or nah?" The decision is obvious, but what isn't are the few hours spent vascillating on the thought. I'm starting to suspect I spend more time thinking (or overthinking) about the picture after I take it rather than before. Gut feeling tells me this is not the right way to forward...we shall see 🤔
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And don't even get me started on captions 😭
  • "Should I post this or nah?" The decision is obvious, but what isn't are the few hours spent vascillating on the thought. I'm starting to suspect I spend more time thinking (or overthinking) about the picture after I take it rather than before. Gut feeling tells me this is not the right way to forward...we shall see 🤔
    .
    .
    And don't even get me started on captions 😭
  • 1,032 3 22 June, 2019
  • Consistency is a quality of a stagnant mind. ~John Sloan
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Do you agree? 😏
  • Consistency is a quality of a stagnant mind. ~John Sloan
    .
    .
    Do you agree? 😏
  • 1,190 12 23 June, 2019
  • Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is on Navajo land east of Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, scenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as "Upper Antelope Canyon" or "The Crack"; and "Lower Antelope Canyon" or "The Corkscrew.
  • Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is on Navajo land east of Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, scenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as "Upper Antelope Canyon" or "The Crack"; and "Lower Antelope Canyon" or "The Corkscrew.
  • 936 27 20 June, 2019
  • Early mornings in Kahala
  • Early mornings in Kahala
  • 1,043 13 28 May, 2019