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  • 6 2 17 minutes ago

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  • In tragedy, it's hard to find a good resolution; it's not black and white: it's a big fog of gray.
  • In tragedy, it's hard to find a good resolution; it's not black and white: it's a big fog of gray.
  • 16 2 53 minutes ago

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  • "The Black diamond from Jharia" . Most of India's coal comes from Jharia. Jharia open coal mines are
India's most important storehouse of a prime coke coal used in blast
furnaces.The people who live and work in the mine steal coal and sell it
on a black market. It is later used to make fire for cooking purposes in small Indian
street restaurants. Settlers from Jharia live in a land of a danger of
subsidence due to fires. What's more, the city is on the brink of an ecological and humanitarian
disaster. The government has been criticised for the helpless approach to the
safety of residents. Heavy fumes emitted by the fires lead to severe breathing problems among local population. Jharia and its surroundings
are very polluted by amonia  mixed with other air pullants from
coal mines which shorten the length of a human life by respiratory
system diseases. Also the pollution  has a big impact on the destruction of
the local ecosystem and clean air  in the Himalayas region. Unfortunately,
Jharia will remain an important site in India as the country's power needs growth.
  • "The Black diamond from Jharia" . Most of India's coal comes from Jharia. Jharia open coal mines are
    India's most important storehouse of a prime coke coal used in blast
    furnaces.The people who live and work in the mine steal coal and sell it
    on a black market. It is later used to make fire for cooking purposes in small Indian
    street restaurants. Settlers from Jharia live in a land of a danger of
    subsidence due to fires. What's more, the city is on the brink of an ecological and humanitarian
    disaster. The government has been criticised for the helpless approach to the
    safety of residents. Heavy fumes emitted by the fires lead to severe breathing problems among local population. Jharia and its surroundings
    are very polluted by amonia mixed with other air pullants from
    coal mines which shorten the length of a human life by respiratory
    system diseases. Also the pollution has a big impact on the destruction of
    the local ecosystem and clean air in the Himalayas region. Unfortunately,
    Jharia will remain an important site in India as the country's power needs growth.
  • 24 2 1 hour ago

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  • 24 3 3 hours ago