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  • The Story of “Wild Bill”
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William “Wild Bill” Guarnere and his wife Frances shortly after the wars end, summer, 1945.
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On August 31st, 1942, William Guarnere enlisted in the United States Army Airborne, starting training at Camp Toccoa outside of Atlanta, Georgia. It was here that he was assigned to Easy Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne. After training within the United States, Guarnere and Easy Company were sent to England to train for D-Day. By this time, he had been made Sergeant and was one of the NCOs that kept Easy Company together throughout the war. Just before D-Day, Guarnere learned of his brothers death at Monte Cassino. With this knowledge, Guarnere jumped into France hellbent to avenge his brother. It was during D-Day he would earn the nickname of “Wild Bill” for his tenacity and recklessness. Guarnere participated in the legendary Brécourt Manor assault during the morning of the 6th. During Operation Market Garden, Guarnere was wounded while riding down the lines, encouraging his men. They were stationed along “The Island”, a hill overlooking the surrounding fields south of the Rhine. Easy Company was spread out thin, prompting Guarnere to commandeer a motorcycle from a local Dutch citizen so he could quickly run down the lines. It was during one of these runs he was shot in the leg by a sniper, throwing him from the motorcycle, further wounding him. While recovering, Guarnere was keen to be assigned to another unit. Therefore, he painted his cast in black shoe polish, covered it over with his pant leg, and walked out of the hospital in severe pain. He was caught by an officer, court-martialed, demoted to Private, and sent back to the hospital. Guarnere, unshaken but these events, said he would go AWOL again and 1 week later was released from the hospital. He rejoined Easy as they were recovering from their heavy losses during Market Garden at Mourlemon-le-Grand. CAPTION CONTINUED DOWN BELOW!
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#ww2 #wwii #worldwar2 #history #historical #learn #hbo #bandofbrothers #paratroopers #bastogne #veterans #veteran #historybuff #military #militaryhistory #belgium #dday #75
  • The Story of “Wild Bill”
    .
    William “Wild Bill” Guarnere and his wife Frances shortly after the wars end, summer, 1945.
    .
    On August 31st, 1942, William Guarnere enlisted in the United States Army Airborne, starting training at Camp Toccoa outside of Atlanta, Georgia. It was here that he was assigned to Easy Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne. After training within the United States, Guarnere and Easy Company were sent to England to train for D-Day. By this time, he had been made Sergeant and was one of the NCOs that kept Easy Company together throughout the war. Just before D-Day, Guarnere learned of his brothers death at Monte Cassino. With this knowledge, Guarnere jumped into France hellbent to avenge his brother. It was during D-Day he would earn the nickname of “Wild Bill” for his tenacity and recklessness. Guarnere participated in the legendary Brécourt Manor assault during the morning of the 6th. During Operation Market Garden, Guarnere was wounded while riding down the lines, encouraging his men. They were stationed along “The Island”, a hill overlooking the surrounding fields south of the Rhine. Easy Company was spread out thin, prompting Guarnere to commandeer a motorcycle from a local Dutch citizen so he could quickly run down the lines. It was during one of these runs he was shot in the leg by a sniper, throwing him from the motorcycle, further wounding him. While recovering, Guarnere was keen to be assigned to another unit. Therefore, he painted his cast in black shoe polish, covered it over with his pant leg, and walked out of the hospital in severe pain. He was caught by an officer, court-martialed, demoted to Private, and sent back to the hospital. Guarnere, unshaken but these events, said he would go AWOL again and 1 week later was released from the hospital. He rejoined Easy as they were recovering from their heavy losses during Market Garden at Mourlemon-le-Grand. CAPTION CONTINUED DOWN BELOW!
    .
    #ww2 #wwii #worldwar2 #history #historical #learn #hbo #bandofbrothers #paratroopers #bastogne #veterans #veteran #historybuff #military #militaryhistory #belgium #dday #75
  • 3,979 34 15 hours ago
  • The Covenanter tanks were ultimately a failure. It was not the greatest moment of British tank engineering. Although probably not as bad a oopsie as the A38 Valiant.
▪︎▪︎▪︎
It had good angular hull armour, but it was all riveted on, instead of welded. Why? Because there wasn't enough welders around and fully welding a cruiser tank was too new at that time for them. But this introduced an increase in weight that was not originally accounted for. To rivet two plates they needed a support frame to rivet it on. Then the wheels were made of steel as the air industry had called dibs on light alloys. Again the weight goes up. The tracks were pretty thin and just managed to take the weight. The armour was made thicker to 30mm I believe adding more weight. By the time all this happened, the suspensions was almost at its limit. So therefore not a lot of new updates could be put in.
▪︎▪︎▪︎
Then there was the issue with the meadows flat 12 and the radiators not being near each other and therefore the cooling system for the engine was bad. Hot water pipes ran through the fighters compartment. Although most likely to affect the driver, the three crew men in the turret also probably did not want to fight with hot water pipes around them in the desert. With all this issues, none of the 1200 actually saw combat. Only one was knocked out by enemy action when the train it was on got bombed.

#Ww2#Warthunder#worldoftanks#Wwii#worldwartwo#Militaryhistory#panzers#tanks#tank#Afv#Tankhistory#20thcenturyhistory
  • The Covenanter tanks were ultimately a failure. It was not the greatest moment of British tank engineering. Although probably not as bad a oopsie as the A38 Valiant.
    ▪︎▪︎▪︎
    It had good angular hull armour, but it was all riveted on, instead of welded. Why? Because there wasn't enough welders around and fully welding a cruiser tank was too new at that time for them. But this introduced an increase in weight that was not originally accounted for. To rivet two plates they needed a support frame to rivet it on. Then the wheels were made of steel as the air industry had called dibs on light alloys. Again the weight goes up. The tracks were pretty thin and just managed to take the weight. The armour was made thicker to 30mm I believe adding more weight. By the time all this happened, the suspensions was almost at its limit. So therefore not a lot of new updates could be put in.
    ▪︎▪︎▪︎
    Then there was the issue with the meadows flat 12 and the radiators not being near each other and therefore the cooling system for the engine was bad. Hot water pipes ran through the fighters compartment. Although most likely to affect the driver, the three crew men in the turret also probably did not want to fight with hot water pipes around them in the desert. With all this issues, none of the 1200 actually saw combat. Only one was knocked out by enemy action when the train it was on got bombed.

    #Ww2 #Warthunder #worldoftanks #Wwii #worldwartwo #Militaryhistory #panzers #tanks #tank #Afv #Tankhistory #20thcenturyhistory
  • 1,466 18 22 July, 2019
  • Just kids...Asked to save the world from tyrants.
  • Just kids...Asked to save the world from tyrants.
  • 2,311 34 20 July, 2019
  • Sgt. Stanley Pillsbury lets fly from his station in the top turret of a B-24D Liberator in the movie Unbroken. Outside of their headphones, though, the gunners didn’t have any ear protection, so you can image how deafening a location the top turret was with its twin .50 cals firing. Although brief, the scenes from the Unbroken film give us a glimpse into Pacific combat on board the B-24. Numerous films capture the action aboard B-17s on Europe, but their coverage of the Liberator is relatively light. The real-life Pillsbury received a serious leg wound during this firefight. (📸:Unbroken)
  • Sgt. Stanley Pillsbury lets fly from his station in the top turret of a B-24D Liberator in the movie Unbroken. Outside of their headphones, though, the gunners didn’t have any ear protection, so you can image how deafening a location the top turret was with its twin .50 cals firing. Although brief, the scenes from the Unbroken film give us a glimpse into Pacific combat on board the B-24. Numerous films capture the action aboard B-17s on Europe, but their coverage of the Liberator is relatively light. The real-life Pillsbury received a serious leg wound during this firefight. (📸:Unbroken)
  • 4,402 21 17 July, 2019
  • Barbed wire was a deadly thing, it kept people in and out and in the great war it was a severe obstacle. Entire barrages of artillery would be used to clear them, but if the shell fuses were not sensitive enough or malfunctioned in any way, it was  a bad time for the attackers. Simply they would trap and ensnare soldiers so they were then flys in a spiders web. They could be picked of at leisure. The Germans arranged their barbed wires in a way that was more effective than that of the British. They were harder to dislodge and cut through. It was a very simple effective tool, that was only defeated by better fuzes and the invention of the tank. I believe it was the Battle of Somme where the British realised that their artillery barrage was ineffective at  cutting the wire. So many soldiers were forced to just suicide charge into the wire.
▪︎▪︎▪︎
Since diving into barbed wire was an slightly unattractive decision for most soldiers, they would go towards places where there seemed to be less of such menaces. So undoubtedly they would go there, through this "channel". But what was on the other side were often machine guns literally mowing people to death. Infact at the Battle of Somme some Germans had to use urine as a coolant as the machine guns own coolant ran out. They had so many Tommies channelled towards them, that the gunners hand was literally burning off because he could not let go of the trigger.

#Ww1#Worldwartwo#worldwarone#militaryhistory#Barbedwire#War#Hell#Pain#History#Germany#Prussia#Somme#1916#France#Verdun#Wwi#thegreatwar
  • Barbed wire was a deadly thing, it kept people in and out and in the great war it was a severe obstacle. Entire barrages of artillery would be used to clear them, but if the shell fuses were not sensitive enough or malfunctioned in any way, it was a bad time for the attackers. Simply they would trap and ensnare soldiers so they were then flys in a spiders web. They could be picked of at leisure. The Germans arranged their barbed wires in a way that was more effective than that of the British. They were harder to dislodge and cut through. It was a very simple effective tool, that was only defeated by better fuzes and the invention of the tank. I believe it was the Battle of Somme where the British realised that their artillery barrage was ineffective at cutting the wire. So many soldiers were forced to just suicide charge into the wire.
    ▪︎▪︎▪︎
    Since diving into barbed wire was an slightly unattractive decision for most soldiers, they would go towards places where there seemed to be less of such menaces. So undoubtedly they would go there, through this "channel". But what was on the other side were often machine guns literally mowing people to death. Infact at the Battle of Somme some Germans had to use urine as a coolant as the machine guns own coolant ran out. They had so many Tommies channelled towards them, that the gunners hand was literally burning off because he could not let go of the trigger.

    #Ww1 #Worldwartwo #worldwarone #militaryhistory #Barbedwire #War #Hell #Pain #History #Germany #Prussia #Somme #1916 #France #Verdun #Wwi #thegreatwar
  • 163 3 14 hours ago
  • 75 Years Ago Today
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US Marines of the 3rd Marine Division take cover along the beach line shortly after landing on the island of Guam, July 21st, 1944.
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On July 21st, 1944, a combined force of Marines and Army infantry landed along on 3 beaches dotted the Guam coast. The 3rd Marine Division landed under looming hills overlooking Agana and the surrounding area while the 77th Infantry Division and 1st Marine Provisional Brigade landed to the south of the Orote Peninsula. Their objective was to cut off the Orote Peninsula where the main airfield on the island was located. Additionally, the Peninsula held the liquor depot for the entire Marianas and the surrounding areas. On the 21st, both the 3rd Marine Division and the 1st Provisional Brigade landed under heavy fire and encountered stiff enemy resistance. The 1st Provisional Brigade landed directly under the Japanese artillery installations located in the hills above. During their approach to the beach and landing, they would loose over 20 fully loaded LVTs. Although the 1st Provisional Brigade was able to secure the beach, the lack of LVTs to bring reinforcements ashore prevented the 1st from being resupplied and reinforced until the next day. During July 22nd and the days following, the Americans on Guam would repel several Japanese counter Banzai attacks. The Japanese could be heard at night weeping and drinking, shortly before launching a Banzai attack. Although most were repelled with limited losses, one massive charge broke through a gap in the 3rd Division lines almost pushing them back to the sea. However, they were halted during a valiant action at a first aid station where even the wounded grabbed weapons and fought off the Japanese. After one week of heavy and costly fighting, much of the Orote Peninsula has been captured. After it’s capture, the rest of the island would be mostly secured with limited encountered Japanese resistance.
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#ww2 #wwii #worldwar2 #pacific #75 #75years #guam #historical #pacific #onthisday #onthisdayinhistory #island #military #militaryhistory #teacher #learn
  • 75 Years Ago Today
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    US Marines of the 3rd Marine Division take cover along the beach line shortly after landing on the island of Guam, July 21st, 1944.
    .
    On July 21st, 1944, a combined force of Marines and Army infantry landed along on 3 beaches dotted the Guam coast. The 3rd Marine Division landed under looming hills overlooking Agana and the surrounding area while the 77th Infantry Division and 1st Marine Provisional Brigade landed to the south of the Orote Peninsula. Their objective was to cut off the Orote Peninsula where the main airfield on the island was located. Additionally, the Peninsula held the liquor depot for the entire Marianas and the surrounding areas. On the 21st, both the 3rd Marine Division and the 1st Provisional Brigade landed under heavy fire and encountered stiff enemy resistance. The 1st Provisional Brigade landed directly under the Japanese artillery installations located in the hills above. During their approach to the beach and landing, they would loose over 20 fully loaded LVTs. Although the 1st Provisional Brigade was able to secure the beach, the lack of LVTs to bring reinforcements ashore prevented the 1st from being resupplied and reinforced until the next day. During July 22nd and the days following, the Americans on Guam would repel several Japanese counter Banzai attacks. The Japanese could be heard at night weeping and drinking, shortly before launching a Banzai attack. Although most were repelled with limited losses, one massive charge broke through a gap in the 3rd Division lines almost pushing them back to the sea. However, they were halted during a valiant action at a first aid station where even the wounded grabbed weapons and fought off the Japanese. After one week of heavy and costly fighting, much of the Orote Peninsula has been captured. After it’s capture, the rest of the island would be mostly secured with limited encountered Japanese resistance.
    .
    #ww2 #wwii #worldwar2 #pacific #75 #75years #guam #historical #pacific #onthisday #onthisdayinhistory #island #military #militaryhistory #teacher #learn
  • 7,226 13 21 July, 2019

Latest Instagram Posts

  • Few moments from our trip to Texas to visit our friends @real_vi_rican We has such a great time.
  • Few moments from our trip to Texas to visit our friends @real_vi_rican We has such a great time.
  • 7 1 11 hours ago
  • The Wilfred Owen, a blonde beer from La Choulette in Hordain in northern France. It's a nice beer on a warmish day. Very Belgian in style.

Short history lesson:
It is dedicated to Wilfred Owen (1883-1918), a British poet and soldier who mainly served in the Manchester Regiment. He also developed a friendship with Siegfried Sassoon during the war.

Wifred was killed in action on 4 November 1918, almost to the hour one week before the signing of the Armistice. He was promoted to Lieutenant the day after his death. Most of his works was published after his death. -

Anthem for Doomed Youth:
What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells,
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, -
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing down of blinds
-
End. If you have read all the above I salute you.

#belgium #belgique #belgie #france #uk #hordain #lachoulette #wilfredowen #beer  #beers #biere #biereartisanale #beerstagram #ale #history #historylesson #militaryhistory #ww1 #thegreatwar #remember #poem #poetry #stillwarm #knaperhage
  • The Wilfred Owen, a blonde beer from La Choulette in Hordain in northern France. It's a nice beer on a warmish day. Very Belgian in style.

    Short history lesson:
    It is dedicated to Wilfred Owen (1883-1918), a British poet and soldier who mainly served in the Manchester Regiment. He also developed a friendship with Siegfried Sassoon during the war.

    Wifred was killed in action on 4 November 1918, almost to the hour one week before the signing of the Armistice. He was promoted to Lieutenant the day after his death. Most of his works was published after his death. -

    Anthem for Doomed Youth:
    What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
    Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
    Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
    Can patter out their hasty orisons.
    No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells,
    Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, -
    The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
    And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

    What candles may be held to speed them all?
    Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
    Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
    The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
    Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
    And each slow dusk a drawing down of blinds
    -
    End. If you have read all the above I salute you.

    #belgium #belgique #belgie #france #uk #hordain #lachoulette #wilfredowen #beer #beers #biere #biereartisanale #beerstagram #ale #history #historylesson #militaryhistory #ww1 #thegreatwar #remember #poem #poetry #stillwarm #knaperhage
  • 7 0 11 hours ago
  • "🇵🇱 🇱🇹 Poland's Golden Age" - (Part 2 = Catholics reaction to Jagiellonian University in Kraków, lots of student from other European lands arrive to seek learning in Kraków, and a Polish King helps build Wawel Castle) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Photo caption - 🇵🇱 The centuries old Wawel Royal Castle, near the left bank of the Vistula River in Kraków, Poland, on October 25th, 2011. Note, the Wawel Cathedral to the (right). This castle was once the seat of the Polish Monarchy from 10th to 18th centuries. — https://www.flickr.com/photos/cecphotography/6281990824 Attribution: Corinne Cavallo -------------------------------------------- The Catholic reaction to the creation of Lubrański Academy in Poznań in the early 1500s, was the creation of Jesuit colleges of comparable quality. The Kraków University (Jagiellonian University) responded with humanist program gymnasiums of its own. The university in Kraków experienced a period of prominence at the turn of the 15th/16th century, when especially the mathematics, astronomy, and geography faculties attracted numerous students from abroad. Latin, Greek, Hebrew and their literatures were popular. By the mid 16th century the Jagiellonian institution entered a crisis stage, and by the early 17th century regressed into Counter-reformational conformism. -------------------------------------------- The Jesuits from the Catholic Church in Poland, took advantage of the infighting and established in 1579 a university college in Vilnius [Lithuania], their efforts at taking over the university in Kraków were unsuccessful. Under those circumstances many students went pursue their studies abroad, for example in Prague. -------------------------------------------- The King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania (Sigismund I the Old: December 8th, 1506 - April 1st, 1548), helped built the still existing Wawel architectural castle, some of the castles older stone buildings date back to 979 AD. His son Sigismund II Augustus, supported those intellectual and artistic activities and surrounded himself with the creative Polish elite. — #🇵🇱🇱🇹PolishGoldenAge
  • "🇵🇱 🇱🇹 Poland's Golden Age" - (Part 2 = Catholics reaction to Jagiellonian University in Kraków, lots of student from other European lands arrive to seek learning in Kraków, and a Polish King helps build Wawel Castle) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Photo caption - 🇵🇱 The centuries old Wawel Royal Castle, near the left bank of the Vistula River in Kraków, Poland, on October 25th, 2011. Note, the Wawel Cathedral to the (right). This castle was once the seat of the Polish Monarchy from 10th to 18th centuries. — https://www.flickr.com/photos/cecphotography/6281990824 Attribution: Corinne Cavallo -------------------------------------------- The Catholic reaction to the creation of Lubrański Academy in Poznań in the early 1500s, was the creation of Jesuit colleges of comparable quality. The Kraków University (Jagiellonian University) responded with humanist program gymnasiums of its own. The university in Kraków experienced a period of prominence at the turn of the 15th/16th century, when especially the mathematics, astronomy, and geography faculties attracted numerous students from abroad. Latin, Greek, Hebrew and their literatures were popular. By the mid 16th century the Jagiellonian institution entered a crisis stage, and by the early 17th century regressed into Counter-reformational conformism. -------------------------------------------- The Jesuits from the Catholic Church in Poland, took advantage of the infighting and established in 1579 a university college in Vilnius [Lithuania], their efforts at taking over the university in Kraków were unsuccessful. Under those circumstances many students went pursue their studies abroad, for example in Prague. -------------------------------------------- The King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania (Sigismund I the Old: December 8th, 1506 - April 1st, 1548), helped built the still existing Wawel architectural castle, some of the castles older stone buildings date back to 979 AD. His son Sigismund II Augustus, supported those intellectual and artistic activities and surrounded himself with the creative Polish elite. — #🇵🇱🇱🇹PolishGoldenAge
  • 50 4 12 hours ago
  • A Swiss Häfeli DH-1 reconnaissance aircraft, Switzerland 1916.

The Häfeli DH-1 was a 1910s Swiss two-seat reconnaissance aircraft, built by the aircraft department of the Federal Construction Works (Eidgenoessische Konstruktionswerkstaette, K+W) at Thun, Switzerland.

In 1915 K + W set up their aircraft department and employed August Häfeli as chief engineer. Häfeli had previously designed the AGO C.I and AGO C.II, German reconnaissance biplanes. His first design was the Häfeli DH-1, similar in concept to his designs for AGO Flugzeugwerke. The DH-1 was a three-bay biplane of wood and fabric construction, it had a fuselage pod with tandem seating for the two-man crew and twin booms mounting the tail. The DH-1 was powered by an Argus As II engine built under licence by Buhler Brothers Limited. Six aircraft were built.

Six DH-1s were built during 1916 but within a year three had been destroyed in accidents. The survivors were withdrawn from service in 1919 and scrapped.

#history #historical #colorized #colorizedphoto #militaryhistory #colorization #ww1 #thegreatwar #aircraft #plane #aviation #swiss #switzerland #wwi #worldwar1
  • A Swiss Häfeli DH-1 reconnaissance aircraft, Switzerland 1916.

    The Häfeli DH-1 was a 1910s Swiss two-seat reconnaissance aircraft, built by the aircraft department of the Federal Construction Works (Eidgenoessische Konstruktionswerkstaette, K+W) at Thun, Switzerland.

    In 1915 K + W set up their aircraft department and employed August Häfeli as chief engineer. Häfeli had previously designed the AGO C.I and AGO C.II, German reconnaissance biplanes. His first design was the Häfeli DH-1, similar in concept to his designs for AGO Flugzeugwerke. The DH-1 was a three-bay biplane of wood and fabric construction, it had a fuselage pod with tandem seating for the two-man crew and twin booms mounting the tail. The DH-1 was powered by an Argus As II engine built under licence by Buhler Brothers Limited. Six aircraft were built.

    Six DH-1s were built during 1916 but within a year three had been destroyed in accidents. The survivors were withdrawn from service in 1919 and scrapped.

    #history #historical #colorized #colorizedphoto #militaryhistory #colorization #ww1 #thegreatwar #aircraft #plane #aviation #swiss #switzerland #wwi #worldwar1
  • 233 3 13 hours ago
  • Just finished Gary Sheffield’s Command and Morale: The British Army on the Western Front 1914-1918. One of the leading historians on the British Army of the First World War, this book is a collection of articles and chapters written throughout his career, some of which I had read previously, and others of which I had not. His chapters on morale, particularly that looking at morale of the BEF 1914-1918 and the other examining man-officer relations in the BEF, are particularly interesting as succinct versions of his seminal book on the subject. Sheffield’s chapter on Hubert Gough, commander of the Fifth Army 1916-1918, is particularly interesting as recent scholarship on Gough is lacking compared to that on his contemporaries such as Henry Rawlinson and Henry Horne, both of which have recent biographies. Other chapters include examinations of the Australians at Pozières, the Battle of Arras, and the role of British forces (rather than Dominion units) in the Hundred Day’s Offensive. Overall it is an interesting and useful book, providing succinct summaries of academic debates, and, usefully, editorial comments on older pieces suggest more recent works on similar topics.
  • Just finished Gary Sheffield’s Command and Morale: The British Army on the Western Front 1914-1918. One of the leading historians on the British Army of the First World War, this book is a collection of articles and chapters written throughout his career, some of which I had read previously, and others of which I had not. His chapters on morale, particularly that looking at morale of the BEF 1914-1918 and the other examining man-officer relations in the BEF, are particularly interesting as succinct versions of his seminal book on the subject. Sheffield’s chapter on Hubert Gough, commander of the Fifth Army 1916-1918, is particularly interesting as recent scholarship on Gough is lacking compared to that on his contemporaries such as Henry Rawlinson and Henry Horne, both of which have recent biographies. Other chapters include examinations of the Australians at Pozières, the Battle of Arras, and the role of British forces (rather than Dominion units) in the Hundred Day’s Offensive. Overall it is an interesting and useful book, providing succinct summaries of academic debates, and, usefully, editorial comments on older pieces suggest more recent works on similar topics.
  • 24 1 14 hours ago
  • "🇵🇱 🇱🇹 Poland's Golden Age" - (Part 1 = The beginning of printing of books in Poland, the large libraries spread about various cities, and the forming of universities & academies) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Photo caption - 🇵🇱 Przegorzały Castle, west of the centre of Kraków, Poland is the one of the Institutes of European cultures, society, and heritage, June 8th, 2009. — https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Willa_Rotunda_w_Przegorzałach.jpg - attribution: ImreKiss -------------------------------------------- What came to be known as the Golden Age in Poland began in the late-15th century in which the Polish printing industry began in Kraków in 1473, and by the early 17th century there were about twenty printing houses within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth: eight were in Kraków, the rest mostly in the cities of Gdańsk, Toruń, and Zamość. -------------------------------------------- The Academy of Kraków (Jagiellonian University - still an open and working university) possessed a well-stocked libraries and smaller collections of literature were increasingly common at noble courts, schools, and in townspeople's households. Illiteracy levels were falling in the late-1400s, as by the end of the 16th century almost every parish ran a school. -------------------------------------------- The Lubrański Academy, an institution of higher learning, was established in Poznań in 1518. During the Reformation in the 16th century in Europe, it resulted in the establishment of a number of gymnasiums, academically oriented secondary schools, some of international renown, as the Protestant denominations wanted to attract more supporters by offering them high quality education within Poland. — #🇵🇱🇱🇹PolishGoldenAge
  • "🇵🇱 🇱🇹 Poland's Golden Age" - (Part 1 = The beginning of printing of books in Poland, the large libraries spread about various cities, and the forming of universities & academies) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Photo caption - 🇵🇱 Przegorzały Castle, west of the centre of Kraków, Poland is the one of the Institutes of European cultures, society, and heritage, June 8th, 2009. — https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Willa_Rotunda_w_Przegorzałach.jpg - attribution: ImreKiss -------------------------------------------- What came to be known as the Golden Age in Poland began in the late-15th century in which the Polish printing industry began in Kraków in 1473, and by the early 17th century there were about twenty printing houses within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth: eight were in Kraków, the rest mostly in the cities of Gdańsk, Toruń, and Zamość. -------------------------------------------- The Academy of Kraków (Jagiellonian University - still an open and working university) possessed a well-stocked libraries and smaller collections of literature were increasingly common at noble courts, schools, and in townspeople's households. Illiteracy levels were falling in the late-1400s, as by the end of the 16th century almost every parish ran a school. -------------------------------------------- The Lubrański Academy, an institution of higher learning, was established in Poznań in 1518. During the Reformation in the 16th century in Europe, it resulted in the establishment of a number of gymnasiums, academically oriented secondary schools, some of international renown, as the Protestant denominations wanted to attract more supporters by offering them high quality education within Poland. — #🇵🇱🇱🇹PolishGoldenAge
  • 43 1 14 hours ago
  • Barbed wire was a deadly thing, it kept people in and out and in the great war it was a severe obstacle. Entire barrages of artillery would be used to clear them, but if the shell fuses were not sensitive enough or malfunctioned in any way, it was  a bad time for the attackers. Simply they would trap and ensnare soldiers so they were then flys in a spiders web. They could be picked of at leisure. The Germans arranged their barbed wires in a way that was more effective than that of the British. They were harder to dislodge and cut through. It was a very simple effective tool, that was only defeated by better fuzes and the invention of the tank. I believe it was the Battle of Somme where the British realised that their artillery barrage was ineffective at  cutting the wire. So many soldiers were forced to just suicide charge into the wire.
▪︎▪︎▪︎
Since diving into barbed wire was an slightly unattractive decision for most soldiers, they would go towards places where there seemed to be less of such menaces. So undoubtedly they would go there, through this "channel". But what was on the other side were often machine guns literally mowing people to death. Infact at the Battle of Somme some Germans had to use urine as a coolant as the machine guns own coolant ran out. They had so many Tommies channelled towards them, that the gunners hand was literally burning off because he could not let go of the trigger.

#Ww1#Worldwartwo#worldwarone#militaryhistory#Barbedwire#War#Hell#Pain#History#Germany#Prussia#Somme#1916#France#Verdun#Wwi#thegreatwar
  • Barbed wire was a deadly thing, it kept people in and out and in the great war it was a severe obstacle. Entire barrages of artillery would be used to clear them, but if the shell fuses were not sensitive enough or malfunctioned in any way, it was a bad time for the attackers. Simply they would trap and ensnare soldiers so they were then flys in a spiders web. They could be picked of at leisure. The Germans arranged their barbed wires in a way that was more effective than that of the British. They were harder to dislodge and cut through. It was a very simple effective tool, that was only defeated by better fuzes and the invention of the tank. I believe it was the Battle of Somme where the British realised that their artillery barrage was ineffective at cutting the wire. So many soldiers were forced to just suicide charge into the wire.
    ▪︎▪︎▪︎
    Since diving into barbed wire was an slightly unattractive decision for most soldiers, they would go towards places where there seemed to be less of such menaces. So undoubtedly they would go there, through this "channel". But what was on the other side were often machine guns literally mowing people to death. Infact at the Battle of Somme some Germans had to use urine as a coolant as the machine guns own coolant ran out. They had so many Tommies channelled towards them, that the gunners hand was literally burning off because he could not let go of the trigger.

    #Ww1 #Worldwartwo #worldwarone #militaryhistory #Barbedwire #War #Hell #Pain #History #Germany #Prussia #Somme #1916 #France #Verdun #Wwi #thegreatwar
  • 163 3 14 hours ago
  • Today, whilst sorting through “my archives” — my stuff that is in various boxes inside a shipping container at my folks’ place here in #Yowah — I came across & found some various pieces of my history and the history of my Nisbet family... reflecting on times past and family history:

3️⃣ the third picture is a picture of a photograph print (hence low res) of that time in 1999, on April 25th, when I was part of the Australian Army contingent (3rd from left, second row) for the “Guard of Honour” at the National Anzac Day Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial, in Canberra, ACT, Australia 🇦🇺 #Nisbet #ClanNisbet #MilitaryHistory #NisbetFamily #AustralianArmy #RisingSun #GuardOfHonour #AnzacDayService #AustralianWarMemorial
  • Today, whilst sorting through “my archives” — my stuff that is in various boxes inside a shipping container at my folks’ place here in #Yowah — I came across & found some various pieces of my history and the history of my Nisbet family... reflecting on times past and family history:

    3️⃣ the third picture is a picture of a photograph print (hence low res) of that time in 1999, on April 25th, when I was part of the Australian Army contingent (3rd from left, second row) for the “Guard of Honour” at the National Anzac Day Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial, in Canberra, ACT, Australia 🇦🇺 #Nisbet #ClanNisbet #MilitaryHistory #NisbetFamily #AustralianArmy #RisingSun #GuardOfHonour #AnzacDayService #AustralianWarMemorial
  • 4 1 14 hours ago
  • Today, whilst sorting through “my archives” — my stuff that is in various boxes inside a shipping container at my folks’ place here in #Yowah — I came across & found some various pieces of my history and the history of my Nisbet family... reflecting on times past and family history:

2️⃣ this picture showing my old DPCU nametag for my “Camos” uniform shirts and one of my Rising Sun patches we used to wear on my Army uniform shirts, as well as one of Rising Sun uniform badges for that I used to have on dress uniforms, during my 5 years of service in the Australian Army 🇦🇺 #Nisbet #ClanNisbet #MilitaryHistory #NisbetFamily  #AustralianArmy #RisingSun #GuardOfHonour #AnzacDayService #AustralianWarMemorial
  • Today, whilst sorting through “my archives” — my stuff that is in various boxes inside a shipping container at my folks’ place here in #Yowah — I came across & found some various pieces of my history and the history of my Nisbet family... reflecting on times past and family history:

    2️⃣ this picture showing my old DPCU nametag for my “Camos” uniform shirts and one of my Rising Sun patches we used to wear on my Army uniform shirts, as well as one of Rising Sun uniform badges for that I used to have on dress uniforms, during my 5 years of service in the Australian Army 🇦🇺 #Nisbet #ClanNisbet #MilitaryHistory #NisbetFamily #AustralianArmy #RisingSun #GuardOfHonour #AnzacDayService #AustralianWarMemorial
  • 5 0 14 hours ago
  • Двинск — Поставы — Барановичи — Пинск. Эти въевшиеся в память в школе слова недавно наполнились для меня новым смыслом.

Деревню Выгонощи разделяет на две части Огинский канал. Два года на восточном берегу стояли российские войска, а на противоположном западном — немецкие. Этот дот как раз немецкий. После войны в нём жили вернувшиеся в сожжёную деревню люди. На немецкой стороне сохранилось много таких дотов, русские же строили блокгаузы из земли и брёвен. Двинск давно стал Даугавпилсом и оказался в другой стране, умерли очевидцы и участники тех событий, а множество молчаливых памятников всё ещё напоминает о той войне, которой почему-то не сильно уделяют внимание в школе.

#vandruj_Belarus
  • Двинск — Поставы — Барановичи — Пинск. Эти въевшиеся в память в школе слова недавно наполнились для меня новым смыслом.

    Деревню Выгонощи разделяет на две части Огинский канал. Два года на восточном берегу стояли российские войска, а на противоположном западном — немецкие. Этот дот как раз немецкий. После войны в нём жили вернувшиеся в сожжёную деревню люди. На немецкой стороне сохранилось много таких дотов, русские же строили блокгаузы из земли и брёвен. Двинск давно стал Даугавпилсом и оказался в другой стране, умерли очевидцы и участники тех событий, а множество молчаливых памятников всё ещё напоминает о той войне, которой почему-то не сильно уделяют внимание в школе.

    #vandruj_Belarus
  • 43 3 14 hours ago