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  • Viva o seu sonho, viva também para fazer o sonho de outras pessoas se tornarem realidade!
Em breve com @juliajoia !
  • Viva o seu sonho, viva também para fazer o sonho de outras pessoas se tornarem realidade!
    Em breve com @juliajoia !
  • 170 8 53 minutes ago
  • Music always help no matter what you going through 🎶
.
做媽媽都會遇到一d湊BB的困難
今日就同大家分享5大舒壓方法❤️
.
1. ME TIME
愛護自己 無論幾忙
都要有專屬於自己嘅時間📲
.
2. 約會
強化同老公的默契💐
我每星期最少同老公約會一次
.
3.享受
享受同BB相處的時間🤱🏻
.
4. 朋友
Ms Leely 有 #mamazoo靚媽說 
搵一班媽媽互相支持打打氣💪🏻
.
5. 放鬆
做一啲自己鍾意嘅事放鬆身心
我就鍾意一邊聽音樂一邊畫畫🎶
你呢?

而家用優惠碼: msleelyandpbear
就可以已八五折優惠買到 Sudio 耳機

春季活動贈禮:買就送 Sudio 設計收納包 (活動期間為 2/15 - 4/30)

@sudio 
#msleelyandpbear 
#sudiosweden 
#sudiomoments
  • Music always help no matter what you going through 🎶
    .
    做媽媽都會遇到一d湊BB的困難
    今日就同大家分享5大舒壓方法❤️
    .
    1. ME TIME
    愛護自己 無論幾忙
    都要有專屬於自己嘅時間📲
    .
    2. 約會
    強化同老公的默契💐
    我每星期最少同老公約會一次
    .
    3.享受
    享受同BB相處的時間🤱🏻
    .
    4. 朋友
    Ms Leely 有 #mamazoo靚媽說
    搵一班媽媽互相支持打打氣💪🏻
    .
    5. 放鬆
    做一啲自己鍾意嘅事放鬆身心
    我就鍾意一邊聽音樂一邊畫畫🎶
    你呢?

    而家用優惠碼: msleelyandpbear
    就可以已八五折優惠買到 Sudio 耳機

    春季活動贈禮:買就送 Sudio 設計收納包 (活動期間為 2/15 - 4/30)

    @sudio
    #msleelyandpbear
    #sudiosweden
    #sudiomoments
  • 196 8 1 hour ago

Latest Instagram Posts

  • Per @milanoclassica Le mille straordinarie inflessioni della voce di Marco Beasley ci fanno scoprire, sulle note delle più famose canzoni napoletane, un ritratto di intensa umanità appartenente a un mondo oggi dimenticato o forse rimosso. In collaborazione con @istitutoitalianodifotografia
  • Per @milanoclassica Le mille straordinarie inflessioni della voce di Marco Beasley ci fanno scoprire, sulle note delle più famose canzoni napoletane, un ritratto di intensa umanità appartenente a un mondo oggi dimenticato o forse rimosso. In collaborazione con @istitutoitalianodifotografia
  • 8 1 4 minutes ago
  • 3...... 😂😂😂
  • 3...... 😂😂😂
  • 8 2 9 minutes ago
  • Après le @sonya7iii c’est au tour de la @gopro Hero7 de rejoindre notre équipe !!! ⭐️😋 jolis tournages en perspective !! 🎬
#hadmos
  • Après le @sonya7iii c’est au tour de la @gopro Hero7 de rejoindre notre équipe !!! ⭐️😋 jolis tournages en perspective !! 🎬
    #hadmos
  • 10 1 13 minutes ago
  • Perché ho scelto di vivere senza troppe reti di sicurezza? Perché è troppo più bello, almeno per me. 
Perché darei mille ore per quell’istante in cui l’emozione è così forte da lasciarti senza parole, e allora lì c’è la musica.
E perché tanto altro tempo lo dedico a quell’altro istante in cui, vivendo come vivo e facendo quel che faccio, raggiungi uno stato di unione così intensa e così personale con l’universo da potertici perdere dentro senza rimpianti.
___________________________
#travelling #thoughts #everydayisagift #musicianlife #backpackerpianist #emotion #lifeisbeautiful #newplans #moreplansthanmemories
  • Perché ho scelto di vivere senza troppe reti di sicurezza? Perché è troppo più bello, almeno per me.
    Perché darei mille ore per quell’istante in cui l’emozione è così forte da lasciarti senza parole, e allora lì c’è la musica.
    E perché tanto altro tempo lo dedico a quell’altro istante in cui, vivendo come vivo e facendo quel che faccio, raggiungi uno stato di unione così intensa e così personale con l’universo da potertici perdere dentro senza rimpianti.
    ___________________________
    #travelling #thoughts #everydayisagift #musicianlife #backpackerpianist #emotion #lifeisbeautiful #newplans #moreplansthanmemories
  • 3 0 13 minutes ago
  • Here’s a chord melody version of ‘Stella By Starlight’ I’ve been working on! Let me know what you guys think!
  • Here’s a chord melody version of ‘Stella By Starlight’ I’ve been working on! Let me know what you guys think!
  • 25 1 18 minutes ago
  • There’s more happening than this.
  • There’s more happening than this.
  • 24 1 20 minutes ago
  • Dieser Moment, wenn die letzten Teile für den nächsten Schritt des Orchesters ankommen 🎶
  • Dieser Moment, wenn die letzten Teile für den nächsten Schritt des Orchesters ankommen 🎶
  • 9 1 24 minutes ago
  • Morning mood.
  • Morning mood.
  • 12 1 1 hour ago
  • Theatrics, a side 🎭
  • Theatrics, a side 🎭
  • 11 1 14 hours ago
  • Why should Daptone, Eli “Paperboy” Reed and James Hunter have all the fun when it comes to churning out classy contemporary/retro soul? It’s a question Nick Waterhouse might have asked himself back in 2010. Or more likely, why can’t that pie get a little bigger with a shot of blue-eyed R&B from a West Coast bred lover of the kind of ’50s and ’60s sounds Austin Powers used to find “groovy baby”? Nine years, three critically acclaimed albums and plenty of road work later, Waterhouse has answered that query to everyone’s satisfaction. His music finds the perfect storm where Ray Charles, the Dap-Kings and JD McPherson meet for a shimmy-shimmy-ko-ko bop combination of styles guaranteed to get any dance floor vibrating. 
But lyrically, everything is not quite as rosy in Waterhouse’s world. On the hip Motown-infused “Wreck the Rod,” he croons, “Love is a trap/ Love is a lovely suicide pact” as backing singers shout “love” in staccato harmony, a King Curtis-styled tenor sax wails, and Waterhouse howls with abandon. On the slinky, stripped-down “Which Was Writ,” he sings, “I used to trust but I learned that I was wrong” over a feline walking bass, subdued guitar and backing “woo-woos.” There are plenty of edgy love tunes too, like the swinging “Urge Coming On,” the disc’s only cover. Here the backing singers bring the churchy Raelettes/Ikettes feel (not surprising since the song’s writer Joshie Joe Armstead was once a member of both those vocal acts) as Waterhouse goes pure Jackie Wilson. 
It’s an all killer-no filler set that’s the culmination of everything Nick Waterhouse has accomplished for the past nine years. He might have plenty bugging him, but with soul music this joyous and exuberant, you’ll be too busy riding the groove to care.
  • Why should Daptone, Eli “Paperboy” Reed and James Hunter have all the fun when it comes to churning out classy contemporary/retro soul? It’s a question Nick Waterhouse might have asked himself back in 2010. Or more likely, why can’t that pie get a little bigger with a shot of blue-eyed R&B from a West Coast bred lover of the kind of ’50s and ’60s sounds Austin Powers used to find “groovy baby”? Nine years, three critically acclaimed albums and plenty of road work later, Waterhouse has answered that query to everyone’s satisfaction. His music finds the perfect storm where Ray Charles, the Dap-Kings and JD McPherson meet for a shimmy-shimmy-ko-ko bop combination of styles guaranteed to get any dance floor vibrating. 
    But lyrically, everything is not quite as rosy in Waterhouse’s world. On the hip Motown-infused “Wreck the Rod,” he croons, “Love is a trap/ Love is a lovely suicide pact” as backing singers shout “love” in staccato harmony, a King Curtis-styled tenor sax wails, and Waterhouse howls with abandon. On the slinky, stripped-down “Which Was Writ,” he sings, “I used to trust but I learned that I was wrong” over a feline walking bass, subdued guitar and backing “woo-woos.” There are plenty of edgy love tunes too, like the swinging “Urge Coming On,” the disc’s only cover. Here the backing singers bring the churchy Raelettes/Ikettes feel (not surprising since the song’s writer Joshie Joe Armstead was once a member of both those vocal acts) as Waterhouse goes pure Jackie Wilson.
    It’s an all killer-no filler set that’s the culmination of everything Nick Waterhouse has accomplished for the past nine years. He might have plenty bugging him, but with soul music this joyous and exuberant, you’ll be too busy riding the groove to care.
  • 497 19 10 March, 2019
  • Twenty years ago, Dido Armstrong released her debut album No Angel with songs that grabbed the attention of the world. With that solid foundation, she released Life for Rent in 2003 which was a decent follow-up. However, a light that was once bright gradually became dull with the blandness that came with her last two outputs, Safe Trip Home and Girl Who Got Away. Although her back catalogue is filled with some monotonous lullabies, songs like "Thank You," "Life for Rent," "White Flag" and "Here With Me" feature the sweet, melodic and atmospheric vignettes that have attracted millions of listeners to her music.
Reemerging, six years since Girl Who Got Away, with her fifth studio album, the British hitmaker has arguably created the most colourful, entertaining and creative album in her discography. Compared to previous materials, Still On My Mind is more seasoned. From pop to dance and electronic, Dido experiments with ingredients she has never used while poetically creating tales that teeter between love and heartbreak. On "Still On My Mind" and "Chances," her voice is wrapped in regret as she reminisces about an old lover. Meanwhile, on the poppier "Mad Love" and the emotional "Have to Say," she describes what it’s like to stay in a relationship through the thick and thin of love: "When your words don’t sound as sweet anymore / I’ll listen to what you say," she sings on the latter.
Dido is an artist known for creating simple and beautiful songs. Although her familiar intimate voice is fully present and her caressing rhythm remains gentle, every song on the album is decorated with creative elements that transform the simplicity in her sound to a dynamic piece of art. Still On My Mind is Dido’s most engaging album to date. It’s her first time trying a style of music that connects multiple genres as well as retaining her original sound and she’s delivered a masterful creation in one take.
  • Twenty years ago, Dido Armstrong released her debut album No Angel with songs that grabbed the attention of the world. With that solid foundation, she released Life for Rent in 2003 which was a decent follow-up. However, a light that was once bright gradually became dull with the blandness that came with her last two outputs, Safe Trip Home and Girl Who Got Away. Although her back catalogue is filled with some monotonous lullabies, songs like "Thank You," "Life for Rent," "White Flag" and "Here With Me" feature the sweet, melodic and atmospheric vignettes that have attracted millions of listeners to her music.
    Reemerging, six years since Girl Who Got Away, with her fifth studio album, the British hitmaker has arguably created the most colourful, entertaining and creative album in her discography. Compared to previous materials, Still On My Mind is more seasoned. From pop to dance and electronic, Dido experiments with ingredients she has never used while poetically creating tales that teeter between love and heartbreak. On "Still On My Mind" and "Chances," her voice is wrapped in regret as she reminisces about an old lover. Meanwhile, on the poppier "Mad Love" and the emotional "Have to Say," she describes what it’s like to stay in a relationship through the thick and thin of love: "When your words don’t sound as sweet anymore / I’ll listen to what you say," she sings on the latter.
    Dido is an artist known for creating simple and beautiful songs. Although her familiar intimate voice is fully present and her caressing rhythm remains gentle, every song on the album is decorated with creative elements that transform the simplicity in her sound to a dynamic piece of art. Still On My Mind is Dido’s most engaging album to date. It’s her first time trying a style of music that connects multiple genres as well as retaining her original sound and she’s delivered a masterful creation in one take.
  • 529 22 8 March, 2019
  • No one serves up catharsis quite like Robyn. Whether you need to hysterically sob or gleefully and blissfully “move your body” across a dance floor, the Swedish pop diva’s Honey is there to satisfy. Remarkably accessible, Robyn’s long-awaited follow-up to her Body Talk trio is the purest purge. It baptizes you with tears or sweat or both, bidding the promise of a deep cleanse. The only faucet necessary is a pair of headphones, or— better yet—a team of pulsing, surround-sound speakers.
Honey dives right in with the heartbreaking-yet-lustrous “Missing U,” the record’s first single and a truly prismatic display of discoteca synth. “Human Being,” follows it, building on disjointed 80s dance beats as Robyn pleas, “Don’t give up on me now.” Thumping groove-track “Because It’s In The Music” is a testimony to the power of dance, and it will shake you to your very core, whatever “it” is for you. Like her 2010 hit “Dancing On My Own,” Robyn platters sorrow in helpings of twinkly beats and deeply empathetic lyrics: “Because it’s in the music / yeah, we were dancing to it.”
If sweltering electro number “Send To Robin Immediately,” is a dancefloor high, “Honey” is the world’s sweetest comedown. It’s a song about lust, but Robyn’s “Honey” could represent any kind of nectar, whatever salve you’re jonesing for: for someone to hear you, understand you or lift you up. “Won’t you get me right where the hurt is?” Robyn sings.
Disco beats surface again on kicker track “Ever Again,” a relentlessly merry, bass-centric light at the end of, well, more light. It’s impossible not to feel inspired or hopeful when you hear Robyn sing, “We’re never gonna be broken hearted ever again / Only gonna sing about love ever again,” unless maybe you’re a robot. But if a robot were to ever feel love, Robyn would be the one to warm its cold, indifferent hardware.
Honey is a near-flawless dance pop album. It doesn’t need political or cultural commentary to assert relevancy; in Robyn’s deep understanding of human emotion and what moves us, Honey feels dire all the same. Release through dance has long been a tactic wielded by humankind, but rarely has it felt this inclusive, kind and positively radiant.
  • No one serves up catharsis quite like Robyn. Whether you need to hysterically sob or gleefully and blissfully “move your body” across a dance floor, the Swedish pop diva’s Honey is there to satisfy. Remarkably accessible, Robyn’s long-awaited follow-up to her Body Talk trio is the purest purge. It baptizes you with tears or sweat or both, bidding the promise of a deep cleanse. The only faucet necessary is a pair of headphones, or— better yet—a team of pulsing, surround-sound speakers.
    Honey dives right in with the heartbreaking-yet-lustrous “Missing U,” the record’s first single and a truly prismatic display of discoteca synth. “Human Being,” follows it, building on disjointed 80s dance beats as Robyn pleas, “Don’t give up on me now.” Thumping groove-track “Because It’s In The Music” is a testimony to the power of dance, and it will shake you to your very core, whatever “it” is for you. Like her 2010 hit “Dancing On My Own,” Robyn platters sorrow in helpings of twinkly beats and deeply empathetic lyrics: “Because it’s in the music / yeah, we were dancing to it.”
    If sweltering electro number “Send To Robin Immediately,” is a dancefloor high, “Honey” is the world’s sweetest comedown. It’s a song about lust, but Robyn’s “Honey” could represent any kind of nectar, whatever salve you’re jonesing for: for someone to hear you, understand you or lift you up. “Won’t you get me right where the hurt is?” Robyn sings.
    Disco beats surface again on kicker track “Ever Again,” a relentlessly merry, bass-centric light at the end of, well, more light. It’s impossible not to feel inspired or hopeful when you hear Robyn sing, “We’re never gonna be broken hearted ever again / Only gonna sing about love ever again,” unless maybe you’re a robot. But if a robot were to ever feel love, Robyn would be the one to warm its cold, indifferent hardware.
    Honey is a near-flawless dance pop album. It doesn’t need political or cultural commentary to assert relevancy; in Robyn’s deep understanding of human emotion and what moves us, Honey feels dire all the same. Release through dance has long been a tactic wielded by humankind, but rarely has it felt this inclusive, kind and positively radiant.
  • 489 15 8 March, 2019
  • If you’ve paid attention to hip-hop in the last few years, you should at least know of Gunna. But you could listen to every Gunna project and feature twice and still have no idea who he actually is. He’s the raisin of rap: unappealing, unexciting, yet somehow still found everywhere.
Given how underwhelming he is on other people's tracks, it’s no wonder that full-length Gunna projects are exercises in tedium, lifted up only by producers like Metro Boomin and London on da Track or fellow rappers, like on Drip Harder, last year’s collaborative project with Lil Baby. His dull flow blurs the songs together, ensuring you’re ready for things to wrap up well before the halfway point. The reassurance of a producer tag at the beginning of a track is just barely enough to power you through. 
Despite its title sounding like another mixtape to throw on the pile, Drip or Drown 2 is actually Gunna’s full-length album debut. It’s largely on the back of vibrant production from Turbo and Wheezy, who provide melodic and textural depth to compensate for Gunna’s shortcomings. Gunna smartly chose "One Call" as the lead single, and even if his lyrics are surface level (“It's a nine in the bag that I tote/ Workin' hard, we ain't havin' no hope”), he’s able to convey some kind of feeling and tell us more than just about how much sex he gets and how rich he is.
A limited range in lyrical topics isn’t the biggest liability, and it’s something you have to accept as a fan of trap. As bland read as his lyrics on paper, they come across even weaker on record. His flow is unaffected and unchanging, and he seems contemptuous about the idea of even making a record.
There’s so much hype around him, but you’re just left dumbfounded as to why. So many tracks slip through your consciousness, particularly with how much he sticks to the formula of chorus/verse/chorus. His dullness sucks the life out of typically energetic guests like Playboi Carti, whose feature is less Die Lit and more Diluted. On "3-Headed Snake," his mentor, Young Thug, offers this bit of absurd wisdom: “Jeepers creepers, the gators got measles, shit.” Call it nonsense, but it still lands better and says more than Gunna ever has.
  • If you’ve paid attention to hip-hop in the last few years, you should at least know of Gunna. But you could listen to every Gunna project and feature twice and still have no idea who he actually is. He’s the raisin of rap: unappealing, unexciting, yet somehow still found everywhere.
    Given how underwhelming he is on other people's tracks, it’s no wonder that full-length Gunna projects are exercises in tedium, lifted up only by producers like Metro Boomin and London on da Track or fellow rappers, like on Drip Harder, last year’s collaborative project with Lil Baby. His dull flow blurs the songs together, ensuring you’re ready for things to wrap up well before the halfway point. The reassurance of a producer tag at the beginning of a track is just barely enough to power you through.
    Despite its title sounding like another mixtape to throw on the pile, Drip or Drown 2 is actually Gunna’s full-length album debut. It’s largely on the back of vibrant production from Turbo and Wheezy, who provide melodic and textural depth to compensate for Gunna’s shortcomings. Gunna smartly chose "One Call" as the lead single, and even if his lyrics are surface level (“It's a nine in the bag that I tote/ Workin' hard, we ain't havin' no hope”), he’s able to convey some kind of feeling and tell us more than just about how much sex he gets and how rich he is.
    A limited range in lyrical topics isn’t the biggest liability, and it’s something you have to accept as a fan of trap. As bland read as his lyrics on paper, they come across even weaker on record. His flow is unaffected and unchanging, and he seems contemptuous about the idea of even making a record.
    There’s so much hype around him, but you’re just left dumbfounded as to why. So many tracks slip through your consciousness, particularly with how much he sticks to the formula of chorus/verse/chorus. His dullness sucks the life out of typically energetic guests like Playboi Carti, whose feature is less Die Lit and more Diluted. On "3-Headed Snake," his mentor, Young Thug, offers this bit of absurd wisdom: “Jeepers creepers, the gators got measles, shit.” Call it nonsense, but it still lands better and says more than Gunna ever has.
  • 435 15 7 March, 2019
  • Back in 2017, the music industry was lit up by a rainbow of Scandinavian pop. It speaks to the absolute affect of Sigrid's music that she stood out: aligned enough with her peers to ride the populist wave, but immediately distinguishable, brilliant.
In Sucker Punch, we see confidence crystallised. A concise package of recent singles and flawless new material, the debut LP just confirms the obvious: Sigrid is a total gift to pop music. And the songs on Sucker Punch radiate her particular brand of empowerment: not the sweeping, air-punching kind we might expect from her counterparts, but a more modest commitment to self-love – especially when life throws its inevitable right hooks.
Each track here glitters. "Sight of You" is the sweetest take: an anthem about how, despite gruelling schedules, AWOL luggage and almost-permanent homesickness, Sigrid feels saved by the sea of adoration that awaits her on stage. "Basic" conjures that first flush of romantic infatuation: Sigrid nails the lyric here ("Let's be real, I'm just saying, If you feel it, don't cage it, Ooh, I wanna be basic") before pulling out the catchy big guns with a brazen 'nah nah nah nah' refrain. And over the skipping '80s vibe of "Mine Right Now," we hear her talk herself out of sabotaging a new relationship by overthinking.
On the technical side, Sigrid's arrangements surpass the genre she rode in on: there's a core of deftly-orchestrated electronic pop, sure, but more classical features abound too – the ringing electric guitar solo that lifts "Sucker Punch"'s final bars; the thunderous strings carrying "Sight of You"'s melody; the piano chords that transform "Basic"'s middle eight. With pop currently consumed with references to trap and dancehall, hearing these delicious deviations is a thrill.
Again, it all comes back to Sigrid's character, and how her beaming confidence gives her arrangements a stand-out flair and her stories a relatableness. Aside from being a near-perfect collection of belting pop, Sucker Punch also carries a message of triumphant grace: if you can try to be your own best friend and love yourself a little more, wonderful things will happen.
  • Back in 2017, the music industry was lit up by a rainbow of Scandinavian pop. It speaks to the absolute affect of Sigrid's music that she stood out: aligned enough with her peers to ride the populist wave, but immediately distinguishable, brilliant.
    In Sucker Punch, we see confidence crystallised. A concise package of recent singles and flawless new material, the debut LP just confirms the obvious: Sigrid is a total gift to pop music. And the songs on Sucker Punch radiate her particular brand of empowerment: not the sweeping, air-punching kind we might expect from her counterparts, but a more modest commitment to self-love – especially when life throws its inevitable right hooks.
    Each track here glitters. "Sight of You" is the sweetest take: an anthem about how, despite gruelling schedules, AWOL luggage and almost-permanent homesickness, Sigrid feels saved by the sea of adoration that awaits her on stage. "Basic" conjures that first flush of romantic infatuation: Sigrid nails the lyric here ("Let's be real, I'm just saying, If you feel it, don't cage it, Ooh, I wanna be basic") before pulling out the catchy big guns with a brazen 'nah nah nah nah' refrain. And over the skipping '80s vibe of "Mine Right Now," we hear her talk herself out of sabotaging a new relationship by overthinking.
    On the technical side, Sigrid's arrangements surpass the genre she rode in on: there's a core of deftly-orchestrated electronic pop, sure, but more classical features abound too – the ringing electric guitar solo that lifts "Sucker Punch"'s final bars; the thunderous strings carrying "Sight of You"'s melody; the piano chords that transform "Basic"'s middle eight. With pop currently consumed with references to trap and dancehall, hearing these delicious deviations is a thrill.
    Again, it all comes back to Sigrid's character, and how her beaming confidence gives her arrangements a stand-out flair and her stories a relatableness. Aside from being a near-perfect collection of belting pop, Sucker Punch also carries a message of triumphant grace: if you can try to be your own best friend and love yourself a little more, wonderful things will happen.
  • 542 11 7 March, 2019
  • When a band has a career that spans across decades, there’s usually a good reason behind it. In the case of Weezer, their longevity has arguably stemmed from the fact that they released two albums early in their career, The Blue Album and Pinkerton, that went on to be major hits and ’90s landscape changers. When a band raises the bar so high so early on, it can be difficult to maintain upward momentum. Yet, Weezer have largely done just that. They established themselves as a beloved band that churned out work that satisfied the public palette. Therefore, anything less than what listeners know they can bring to the table feels like a step backward.
And that feeling is legitimate when it comes to Weezer’s latest release, The Black Album. Weezer strayed further than usual from what is considered to be their traditional sound, incorporating electronic elements, dabbling in light rap, and even devoting an entire song to zombies. While experimentation is not damning by any means, it can be if it results in an overall loss of quality — something that The Black Album serves as a cautionary tale of. 
The Black Album contains moments where instrumentation and vocal performance truly shine through, and this is perhaps best exemplified within “High as a Kite." With its soft ambiance and introspective narrative, the track serves as a rich oasis amidst an album that can otherwise feel challenging to digest. Unlike other tracks on The Black Album, where it appears that some semblance of rap is being attempted, “High as a Kite” is a reminder of the strong voice that Rivers Cuomo has always had and how well-suited it is for conquering long, full melodies.
What detracts from Cuomo’s vocal performance and even some promising compositions are bizarre lyrical choices that nearly every track falls victim to in one way or another. It’s out of character for a band that have proven themselves capable of writing lyrics several echelons beyond where they’ve landed with The Black Album. 
Their decision to undertake a pop/electronic hybrid sound on The Black Album was intentional, and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, innovation never has to come at the expense of good songwriting.
  • When a band has a career that spans across decades, there’s usually a good reason behind it. In the case of Weezer, their longevity has arguably stemmed from the fact that they released two albums early in their career, The Blue Album and Pinkerton, that went on to be major hits and ’90s landscape changers. When a band raises the bar so high so early on, it can be difficult to maintain upward momentum. Yet, Weezer have largely done just that. They established themselves as a beloved band that churned out work that satisfied the public palette. Therefore, anything less than what listeners know they can bring to the table feels like a step backward.
    And that feeling is legitimate when it comes to Weezer’s latest release, The Black Album. Weezer strayed further than usual from what is considered to be their traditional sound, incorporating electronic elements, dabbling in light rap, and even devoting an entire song to zombies. While experimentation is not damning by any means, it can be if it results in an overall loss of quality — something that The Black Album serves as a cautionary tale of.
    The Black Album contains moments where instrumentation and vocal performance truly shine through, and this is perhaps best exemplified within “High as a Kite." With its soft ambiance and introspective narrative, the track serves as a rich oasis amidst an album that can otherwise feel challenging to digest. Unlike other tracks on The Black Album, where it appears that some semblance of rap is being attempted, “High as a Kite” is a reminder of the strong voice that Rivers Cuomo has always had and how well-suited it is for conquering long, full melodies.
    What detracts from Cuomo’s vocal performance and even some promising compositions are bizarre lyrical choices that nearly every track falls victim to in one way or another. It’s out of character for a band that have proven themselves capable of writing lyrics several echelons beyond where they’ve landed with The Black Album.
    Their decision to undertake a pop/electronic hybrid sound on The Black Album was intentional, and there’s nothing wrong with that. However, innovation never has to come at the expense of good songwriting.
  • 582 22 4 March, 2019
  • loops in my brain ♾🎧
  • loops in my brain ♾🎧
  • 108 5 26 February, 2019
  • Studio time 🎹🎧
  • Studio time 🎹🎧
  • 110 7 23 February, 2019