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  • Audrey Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart dance in Sabrina. 1954.
👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!
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Many critics felt that Bogart was miscast in the film, and that co-star William Holden should have played Linus with a younger actor as David.
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At the time of filming, Hepburn was 24 years old. Her romantic interests were played by then 35-year-old Holden and 53-year-old Bogart.
  • Audrey Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart dance in Sabrina. 1954.
    👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!

    Many critics felt that Bogart was miscast in the film, and that co-star William Holden should have played Linus with a younger actor as David.

    At the time of filming, Hepburn was 24 years old. Her romantic interests were played by then 35-year-old Holden and 53-year-old Bogart.
  • 3,509 46 15 March, 2019
  • Marilyn Monroe sings "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. 1953.
👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!
⁣
Monroe was originally going to be dressed in nothing but bands of black velvet and masses of rhinestones, creating the illusion of a woman-sized diamond necklace. However, the design was deemed too revealing and vetoed by the studio in favor of the now iconic pink dress.
  • Marilyn Monroe sings "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. 1953.
    👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!

    Monroe was originally going to be dressed in nothing but bands of black velvet and masses of rhinestones, creating the illusion of a woman-sized diamond necklace. However, the design was deemed too revealing and vetoed by the studio in favor of the now iconic pink dress.
  • 5,255 35 17 March, 2019
  • Audrey Hepburn photographed in the Belgian Congo during the filming of The Nun's Story, 1958.
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📷 Photo by Leo Fuchs
  • Audrey Hepburn photographed in the Belgian Congo during the filming of The Nun's Story, 1958.
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    📷 Photo by Leo Fuchs
  • 16,384 66 15 March, 2019
  • Happy heavenly birthday to the dancing legend, Cyd Charisse!
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Here she is performing Baby You Knock Me Out in It’s Always Fair Weather (1955).
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[March 8th 1922 – June 17th 2008 ]
  • Happy heavenly birthday to the dancing legend, Cyd Charisse!
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    Here she is performing Baby You Knock Me Out in It’s Always Fair Weather (1955).
    -
    [March 8th 1922 – June 17th 2008 ]
  • 4,756 88 8 March, 2019
  • Marlon Brando and his cat photographed at home in Los Angeles, 1954.
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📷 Photos by Murray Garrett
  • Marlon Brando and his cat photographed at home in Los Angeles, 1954.
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    📷 Photos by Murray Garrett
  • 10,786 123 9 March, 2019
  • Elvis Presley sings and dances in Jailhouse Rock. 1957.
👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!
⁣
Originally, choreographer Alex Romero created a dance for the song that was in a style apropos for a more classically-trained dancer than Presley.

When Romero realized that his plans for the number were never going to work, he asked Presley how would he normally move to the song, leading Presley to become the uncredited choreographer for what many consider his most famous dance number in all of his films.
  • Elvis Presley sings and dances in Jailhouse Rock. 1957.
    👉 Follow @omeletocom for more!

    Originally, choreographer Alex Romero created a dance for the song that was in a style apropos for a more classically-trained dancer than Presley.

    When Romero realized that his plans for the number were never going to work, he asked Presley how would he normally move to the song, leading Presley to become the uncredited choreographer for what many consider his most famous dance number in all of his films.
  • 3,697 47 17 March, 2019
  • Rita Hayworth photographed for Salome, 1953.
  • Rita Hayworth photographed for Salome, 1953.
  • 9,760 61 14 March, 2019
  • Me returning to Instagram after attempting to get on 100+ times today...⁣
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Jayne Mansfield and Tom Ewell in The Girl Can’t Help It (1956) ❤️
  • Me returning to Instagram after attempting to get on 100+ times today...⁣

    Jayne Mansfield and Tom Ewell in The Girl Can’t Help It (1956) ❤️
  • 3,245 26 14 March, 2019

Latest Instagram Posts

  • “Of course, I would like to play the guy next door, but nobody's going to hire me for that kind of role.” Instead Brad Dourif (1950-) in his wide variety of often acclaimed characterisations has played everyone else. 
Born in West Virginia, Dourif was surrounded by the arts. An artist father who died early on - he was raised by his stepfather a champion golfer - and amateur actress mother, he followed her lead instead into acting and passed on being an artist. School productions, a member of the Huntington Players, he later quit school to come to NYC to find work as an actor. Training and working in repertory and off-Broadway he was discovered by director Milos Foreman who cast him as the heartbreaking Billy Bibbit in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” His first on screen role in “W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings” with Reynolds had ended up on the cutting room floor. An immediate sensation like the Oscar winning film he received an Oscar nomination. Selected by exhibitors as one of the Stars of Tomorrow in ‘75, rather than capitalising on his fame he retreated back to New York for more training and to teach acting and returned for supporting parts in the Schneider drama “Group Portrait of a Lady” and more notably the thriller “Eyes of Laura Mars” with Dunaway. Huston’s “Wise Blood” would perhaps be his best chance on screen that despite a fine lead performance was little scene. Back to supporting roles he appeared in the infamous “Heavens Gate” and the box-office disappointment “Ragtime” in both cases to great effect. “Dune”, “Blue Velvet”, a good part in “Mississippi Burning” and a horror film called “Child’s Play.” With his catchphrase "I'm Chucky, wanna play?” this box-office smash as Chucky, together with its sequels it threatened to overshadowed his entire career. Working regularly, his most seen film of his later career being part of “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers”, he once said, “Being a character actor is a very insecure life. You don't always get to do what you want. I guess the reason I've held on is because I love it.” Rarely the guy next door, but a immensely talented actor who has played deranged, eccentric and vulnerable with flair. #brad
  • “Of course, I would like to play the guy next door, but nobody's going to hire me for that kind of role.” Instead Brad Dourif (1950-) in his wide variety of often acclaimed characterisations has played everyone else.
    Born in West Virginia, Dourif was surrounded by the arts. An artist father who died early on - he was raised by his stepfather a champion golfer - and amateur actress mother, he followed her lead instead into acting and passed on being an artist. School productions, a member of the Huntington Players, he later quit school to come to NYC to find work as an actor. Training and working in repertory and off-Broadway he was discovered by director Milos Foreman who cast him as the heartbreaking Billy Bibbit in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” His first on screen role in “W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings” with Reynolds had ended up on the cutting room floor. An immediate sensation like the Oscar winning film he received an Oscar nomination. Selected by exhibitors as one of the Stars of Tomorrow in ‘75, rather than capitalising on his fame he retreated back to New York for more training and to teach acting and returned for supporting parts in the Schneider drama “Group Portrait of a Lady” and more notably the thriller “Eyes of Laura Mars” with Dunaway. Huston’s “Wise Blood” would perhaps be his best chance on screen that despite a fine lead performance was little scene. Back to supporting roles he appeared in the infamous “Heavens Gate” and the box-office disappointment “Ragtime” in both cases to great effect. “Dune”, “Blue Velvet”, a good part in “Mississippi Burning” and a horror film called “Child’s Play.” With his catchphrase "I'm Chucky, wanna play?” this box-office smash as Chucky, together with its sequels it threatened to overshadowed his entire career. Working regularly, his most seen film of his later career being part of “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers”, he once said, “Being a character actor is a very insecure life. You don't always get to do what you want. I guess the reason I've held on is because I love it.” Rarely the guy next door, but a immensely talented actor who has played deranged, eccentric and vulnerable with flair. #brad
  • 14 2 1 hour ago
  • 19 1 1 hour ago
  • Film: 📽|Venom|
  • Film: 📽|Venom|
  • 36 3 2 hours ago
  • Good night 🌙😘💤 ❤️
  • Good night 🌙😘💤 ❤️
  • 85 1 2 hours ago
  • Ferris Bueller’s Day Off 🏎
  • Ferris Bueller’s Day Off 🏎
  • 6 1 4 hours ago
  • 145 32 5 hours ago
  • Marilyn Monroe was institutionalized in Payne Whitney’s psychiatric unit from February 5th until February 9th, until she was transferred to Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital Medical Hospital, where Marilyn remained from February 10th to March 15th in 1961. Marilyn was seeing a new psychiatrist at the time, Dr. Ralph Greenson, and sent him this following letters, from Columbia Presbyterian. -
March 1, 1961:
“Just now when I looked out the hospital window where the snow had covered everything suddenly everything is kind of muted a green. The grass, shabby evergreen bushes — though the trees give me a little hope — the desolate bare branches promising maybe there will be spring and maybe they promise hope. Did you see “The Misfits” yet? In one sequence you can perhaps see how bare and strange a tree can be for me. I don’t know if it comes across that way for sure on the screen — I don’t like some of the selections in the takes they used. As I started to write this letter about four quiet tears had fallen. I don’t know quite why. Last night I was awake all night again. Sometimes I wonder what the night time is for. It almost doesn’t exist for me — it all seems like one long, long horrible day. Anyway, I thought I’d try to be constructive about it and started to read the letters of Sigmund Freud. When I first opened the book I saw the picture of Freud inside opposite the title page and I burst into tears — he looked very depressed (which must have been taken near the end of his life) that he died a disappointed man — but Dr Kris said he had much physical pain which I had known from the Jones book — but I know this too to be so but still I trust my instincts because I see a sad disappointment in his gentle face. The book reveals (though I am not sure anyone’s love-letters should be published) that he wasn’t a stiff!There was no empathy at Payne-Whitney.” Marilyn Monroe photographed by fans leaving Payne Whitney with publicist Pat Newcomb in 1961. 😔
  • Marilyn Monroe was institutionalized in Payne Whitney’s psychiatric unit from February 5th until February 9th, until she was transferred to Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital Medical Hospital, where Marilyn remained from February 10th to March 15th in 1961. Marilyn was seeing a new psychiatrist at the time, Dr. Ralph Greenson, and sent him this following letters, from Columbia Presbyterian. -
    March 1, 1961:
    “Just now when I looked out the hospital window where the snow had covered everything suddenly everything is kind of muted a green. The grass, shabby evergreen bushes — though the trees give me a little hope — the desolate bare branches promising maybe there will be spring and maybe they promise hope. Did you see “The Misfits” yet? In one sequence you can perhaps see how bare and strange a tree can be for me. I don’t know if it comes across that way for sure on the screen — I don’t like some of the selections in the takes they used. As I started to write this letter about four quiet tears had fallen. I don’t know quite why. Last night I was awake all night again. Sometimes I wonder what the night time is for. It almost doesn’t exist for me — it all seems like one long, long horrible day. Anyway, I thought I’d try to be constructive about it and started to read the letters of Sigmund Freud. When I first opened the book I saw the picture of Freud inside opposite the title page and I burst into tears — he looked very depressed (which must have been taken near the end of his life) that he died a disappointed man — but Dr Kris said he had much physical pain which I had known from the Jones book — but I know this too to be so but still I trust my instincts because I see a sad disappointment in his gentle face. The book reveals (though I am not sure anyone’s love-letters should be published) that he wasn’t a stiff!There was no empathy at Payne-Whitney.” Marilyn Monroe photographed by fans leaving Payne Whitney with publicist Pat Newcomb in 1961. 😔
  • 310 6 7 hours ago
  • "There's so such place as San Fransisco!" Rosalind Russell as Mame Dennis in Auntie Mame, 1958.😂 Definitely one of the most funniest scenes ever in film, in my opinion!
  • "There's so such place as San Fransisco!" Rosalind Russell as Mame Dennis in Auntie Mame, 1958.😂 Definitely one of the most funniest scenes ever in film, in my opinion!
  • 322 16 7 hours ago
  • In 1938,10 year old, Shirley Temple was the highest grossing star in Hollywood. This was verified by the Quigley poll of exhibitors, which showed that she had been number one for four years in a row. Most of Temple’s films were tailor-made by 20th Century-Fox to fit the young actress’s considerable talents and many were remakes of Mary Pickford’s silent motion pictures. Francis Hodgson Burnett‘s tale “The Little Princess” had been around since 1888 and had been adapted many times for the stage and screen before Temple was cast as the title heroin. This was the first Temple movie to be made in Technicolor. The “princess” is wealthy little Sara Crewe who is put in an exclusive boarding school when her father (Ian Hunter) goes off to the Boer War. When the Captain is reported missing and the tuition checks stop coming, Sara, now thought to be an orphan, is reduced from privileged student to lowly servant who scrubs floors and cleans out the fireplaces. Always a positive thinker, Sara is convinced her father is alive and goes to various veterans hospitals until she finally finds him. Temple does very little singing or dancing in The Little Princess, yet many consider this to be her finest dramatic performance. The film is first rate as well, with a tight script, excellent production values, and firm direction by Walter Lang. The Little Princess also includes great performances from Arthur Treacher (as Bertie), Mary Nash (the mean school matron) and Sybil Jason (the servant girl at the school).
  • In 1938,10 year old, Shirley Temple was the highest grossing star in Hollywood. This was verified by the Quigley poll of exhibitors, which showed that she had been number one for four years in a row. Most of Temple’s films were tailor-made by 20th Century-Fox to fit the young actress’s considerable talents and many were remakes of Mary Pickford’s silent motion pictures. Francis Hodgson Burnett‘s tale “The Little Princess” had been around since 1888 and had been adapted many times for the stage and screen before Temple was cast as the title heroin. This was the first Temple movie to be made in Technicolor. The “princess” is wealthy little Sara Crewe who is put in an exclusive boarding school when her father (Ian Hunter) goes off to the Boer War. When the Captain is reported missing and the tuition checks stop coming, Sara, now thought to be an orphan, is reduced from privileged student to lowly servant who scrubs floors and cleans out the fireplaces. Always a positive thinker, Sara is convinced her father is alive and goes to various veterans hospitals until she finally finds him. Temple does very little singing or dancing in The Little Princess, yet many consider this to be her finest dramatic performance. The film is first rate as well, with a tight script, excellent production values, and firm direction by Walter Lang. The Little Princess also includes great performances from Arthur Treacher (as Bertie), Mary Nash (the mean school matron) and Sybil Jason (the servant girl at the school).
  • 47 6 8 hours ago
  • The Young Pope (2016).
  • The Young Pope (2016).
  • 88 1 12 hours ago