#ushistory Instagram Photos & Videos

ushistory - 197.8k posts

Top Posts

  • Happy birthday Ted! -
-
Born on February 22nd who would be 88 years old today ❤️
  • Happy birthday Ted! -
    -
    Born on February 22nd who would be 88 years old today ❤️
  • 198 4 21 hours ago
  • Jack at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1963 🌟
  • Jack at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1963 🌟
  • 282 4 21 February, 2020
  • Mongol leader Genghis Khan (1162-1227) rose from humble beginnings to establish the largest land empire in history. After uniting the nomadic tribes of the Mongolian plateau, he conquered huge chunks of central Asia and China. His descendants expanded the empire even further, advancing to such far-off places as Poland, Vietnam, Syria and Korea. At their peak, the Mongols controlled between 11 and 12 million contiguous square miles, an area about the size of Africa. Many people were slaughtered in the course of Genghis Khan’s invasions, but he also granted religious freedom to his subjects, abolished torture, encouraged trade and created the first international postal system. Genghis Khan died in 1227 during a military campaign against the Chinese kingdom of Xi Xia. - In 1219 Genghis Khan went to war against the Khwarezm Empire in present-day Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan and Iran. The sultan there had agreed to a trade treaty, but when the first caravan arrived its goods were stolen and its merchants were killed. The sultan then murdered some of Genghis Khan’s ambassadors. Despite once again being outnumbered, the Mongol horde swept through one Khwarezm city after another, including Bukhara, Samarkand and Urgench. Skilled workers such as carpenters and jewelers were usually saved, while aristocrats and resisting soldiers were killed. Unskilled workers, meanwhile, were often used as human shields during the next assault. -
Genghis Khan conquered more than twice as much land as any other person in history, bringing Eastern and Western civilizations into contact in the process. His descendants, including Ogodei and Khubilai, were also prolific conquerors, taking control of Eastern Europe, the Middle East and the rest of China, among other places. The Mongols even invaded Japan and Java before their empire broke apart in the 14th century. Genghis Khan’s last ruling descendant was finally deposed in 1920. ➡️ Follow @educational.history.memes for more memes with in-depth historical captions
•
•
•
•
• 
#historymemes #historicalmemes #history #memes #dankmemes #learning #educational #ww2memes #ww1memes #ww2 #ww1 #ushistory #worldhistory #americanhistory #ib
  • Mongol leader Genghis Khan (1162-1227) rose from humble beginnings to establish the largest land empire in history. After uniting the nomadic tribes of the Mongolian plateau, he conquered huge chunks of central Asia and China. His descendants expanded the empire even further, advancing to such far-off places as Poland, Vietnam, Syria and Korea. At their peak, the Mongols controlled between 11 and 12 million contiguous square miles, an area about the size of Africa. Many people were slaughtered in the course of Genghis Khan’s invasions, but he also granted religious freedom to his subjects, abolished torture, encouraged trade and created the first international postal system. Genghis Khan died in 1227 during a military campaign against the Chinese kingdom of Xi Xia. - In 1219 Genghis Khan went to war against the Khwarezm Empire in present-day Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan and Iran. The sultan there had agreed to a trade treaty, but when the first caravan arrived its goods were stolen and its merchants were killed. The sultan then murdered some of Genghis Khan’s ambassadors. Despite once again being outnumbered, the Mongol horde swept through one Khwarezm city after another, including Bukhara, Samarkand and Urgench. Skilled workers such as carpenters and jewelers were usually saved, while aristocrats and resisting soldiers were killed. Unskilled workers, meanwhile, were often used as human shields during the next assault. -
    Genghis Khan conquered more than twice as much land as any other person in history, bringing Eastern and Western civilizations into contact in the process. His descendants, including Ogodei and Khubilai, were also prolific conquerors, taking control of Eastern Europe, the Middle East and the rest of China, among other places. The Mongols even invaded Japan and Java before their empire broke apart in the 14th century. Genghis Khan’s last ruling descendant was finally deposed in 1920. ➡️ Follow @educational.history.memes for more memes with in-depth historical captions





    #historymemes #historicalmemes #history #memes #dankmemes #learning #educational #ww2memes #ww1memes #ww2 #ww1 #ushistory #worldhistory #americanhistory #ib
  • 4,904 38 19 February, 2020

Latest Instagram Posts

  • Only four years after the Lewis and Clark Expedition, fur tycoon John Jacob Astor endeavored to settle the Pacific Northwest. It did not go well, but it dramatically impacted #UShistory. Hear the story!#historyhighlights
  • Only four years after the Lewis and Clark Expedition, fur tycoon John Jacob Astor endeavored to settle the Pacific Northwest. It did not go well, but it dramatically impacted #UShistory . Hear the story! #historyhighlights
  • 0 0 2 minutes ago
  • Jack and Jackie 💞
  • Jack and Jackie 💞
  • 43 1 41 minutes ago
  • It is hard to imagine but we actually have photos of some veterans of the American Revolution. These men entered the war in their early teens and survived long enough to be photographed at the end of their lives. At 105, Cook was the oldest surviving veteran of the war. He joined the Continental Army in 1781, only convincing the recruiter because he volunteered to serve for the duration of the war. Cook was in the Army at Brandywine and at Yorktown, under the command of Washington, Lafayette, and Rochambeau. He remembered Washington ordered his men not to laugh at the British after the surrender, because surrender was bad enough.(info from Blake Stilwell)
#veterans #usa #americanmilitary #americanrevolution #apush #ushistory #americanhistory #hamilton #1776 #murica
  • It is hard to imagine but we actually have photos of some veterans of the American Revolution. These men entered the war in their early teens and survived long enough to be photographed at the end of their lives. At 105, Cook was the oldest surviving veteran of the war. He joined the Continental Army in 1781, only convincing the recruiter because he volunteered to serve for the duration of the war. Cook was in the Army at Brandywine and at Yorktown, under the command of Washington, Lafayette, and Rochambeau. He remembered Washington ordered his men not to laugh at the British after the surrender, because surrender was bad enough.(info from Blake Stilwell)
    #veterans #usa #americanmilitary #americanrevolution #apush #ushistory #americanhistory #hamilton #1776 #murica
  • 10 0 54 minutes ago
  • Now All Together: February 23rd 1945, D-Day +3 for the marines and sailors on Iwo Jima. The 536ft Mount Suribachi loomed over the black beaches, and provided excellent vantage. Capturing the volcanic mountain became a priority of the Marines. A 40-man combat patrol, led by 1st Lt. Harold G. Schrier, set their sights on reaching the summit, and with them, they carried a US flag from the USS Missoula and were ordered to raise the flag once they met their destination. They did and at around 10:30 am the Stars and Stripes flew over Iwo. Tom Price, a sailor on board the Missoula remembered that the hundreds of ships off the coast all blew their sirens once they saw the flag. There was one problem, the flag was not easily viewable from the northern side of the island, and thus they searched for a bigger flag. LST-799, a tank landing ship provided the perfect flag, being 56X96 inches. Members of the 2nd battalion 28th marines scaled the mountain along with photographer Joe Rosenthal Sgt Bill Genaust. The Marines which included Ira Hayes, Harold Schultz, Michael Strank, Frank Sousley, Harold Keller, and Harlon Block (left-right), attached the flag to an old Japanese water pipe, and as they were hoisting it, Rosenthal quickly turned around and snapped a few photos with his speed graphic camera, while Genaust filmed it. He nearly missed what would become one of the most recognizable images in human history. Once the photo hit the press, it became the face of victory and the 7th war loan, Rene Gagnon (H. Keller) and John Bradley (H. Schultz) who were misidentified as being flag raisers along with Ira Hayes were sent on warbond tours around the US and became national heroes and celebrities, much to their dismay. The photo won the Pulitzer Prize and helped raised millions of dollars for the war effort. The public saw victory in sight and it boosted the morale of the troops fighting all around the world. The picture inspired the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington VA. This photo helped solidify the Battle of Iwo Jima in the public psyche and in American history, and remains now as it was 75 years ago a symbol of American freedom, heroism, and determination.
  • Now All Together: February 23rd 1945, D-Day +3 for the marines and sailors on Iwo Jima. The 536ft Mount Suribachi loomed over the black beaches, and provided excellent vantage. Capturing the volcanic mountain became a priority of the Marines. A 40-man combat patrol, led by 1st Lt. Harold G. Schrier, set their sights on reaching the summit, and with them, they carried a US flag from the USS Missoula and were ordered to raise the flag once they met their destination. They did and at around 10:30 am the Stars and Stripes flew over Iwo. Tom Price, a sailor on board the Missoula remembered that the hundreds of ships off the coast all blew their sirens once they saw the flag. There was one problem, the flag was not easily viewable from the northern side of the island, and thus they searched for a bigger flag. LST-799, a tank landing ship provided the perfect flag, being 56X96 inches. Members of the 2nd battalion 28th marines scaled the mountain along with photographer Joe Rosenthal Sgt Bill Genaust. The Marines which included Ira Hayes, Harold Schultz, Michael Strank, Frank Sousley, Harold Keller, and Harlon Block (left-right), attached the flag to an old Japanese water pipe, and as they were hoisting it, Rosenthal quickly turned around and snapped a few photos with his speed graphic camera, while Genaust filmed it. He nearly missed what would become one of the most recognizable images in human history. Once the photo hit the press, it became the face of victory and the 7th war loan, Rene Gagnon (H. Keller) and John Bradley (H. Schultz) who were misidentified as being flag raisers along with Ira Hayes were sent on warbond tours around the US and became national heroes and celebrities, much to their dismay. The photo won the Pulitzer Prize and helped raised millions of dollars for the war effort. The public saw victory in sight and it boosted the morale of the troops fighting all around the world. The picture inspired the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington VA. This photo helped solidify the Battle of Iwo Jima in the public psyche and in American history, and remains now as it was 75 years ago a symbol of American freedom, heroism, and determination.
  • 4 1 1 hour ago
  • The last tour of the day to @ftsumternps included a flag lowering ceremony. We’ve been really upset by the divisiveness of the current political climate in the United States, actions that have gone unchecked, and have felt a bit powerless at times to feel like there’s anything we can do about it (besides vote of course!), but being here in such a historical spot and thinking about the country on a whole and all who have fought for the ability to raise and lower this flag, was a truly powerful and reflective moment for us. 🇺🇸♥️
  • The last tour of the day to @ftsumternps included a flag lowering ceremony. We’ve been really upset by the divisiveness of the current political climate in the United States, actions that have gone unchecked, and have felt a bit powerless at times to feel like there’s anything we can do about it (besides vote of course!), but being here in such a historical spot and thinking about the country on a whole and all who have fought for the ability to raise and lower this flag, was a truly powerful and reflective moment for us. 🇺🇸♥️
  • 19 3 1 hour ago
  • Spring in on the horizon but not by the looks of this picture. This scenery actually reminds me of an old skate park but it's a National park folks! This is known as Fort Washington. For many decades it was the only defensive fort protecting DC, as it located just south in Maryland right on on the Potomac. It was constructed with an excellent cannon shot right down the river, which came in handy a couple of times in the forts history. I am actually sitting where cannons once were. After WWII it was turned over to the Department of the Interior and now  offers walking trails, fishing and even war reenactments.
  • Spring in on the horizon but not by the looks of this picture. This scenery actually reminds me of an old skate park but it's a National park folks! This is known as Fort Washington. For many decades it was the only defensive fort protecting DC, as it located just south in Maryland right on on the Potomac. It was constructed with an excellent cannon shot right down the river, which came in handy a couple of times in the forts history. I am actually sitting where cannons once were. After WWII it was turned over to the Department of the Interior and now offers walking trails, fishing and even war reenactments.
  • 15 2 1 hour ago
  • This #blackhistorymonth post is about narrative power.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
I believe this is one of the best photographs I have ever composed. I shot it in the Fall of 1995 in Washington, D.C. at the Million Man March. It was my first trip back to DC from my freshman year at Harvard, and I had my 35mm camera with me as I always did. The day was positive. I honestly don’t remember the speeches. I remember the fellowship with my fellow Harvard men. I remember the community. I remember the positivity. And I remember seeing this little cluster of unhappy-looking white people assigned to cover the event for the press. I spotted the scene and instinctively captured it.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Later I took a look and saw something more: people who had been given the power and authority to tell the story of us, but who had physically and emotionally disconnected themselves from our experience and our story. They literally roped themselves off in a tiny area bound by bins labeled “Trash ONLY Please.” This one shot captured generations of news media, Hollywood films, television programming, and more.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
For those of us in communities whose stories get perverted or not told at all, we’ve got to tell our own, and we increasingly have that power. For those granted the power to tell the story of a community different from our own, we’ve got to get close. We’ve got to remove the barriers, physical and metaphorical, if we’re going to have a chance and telling that story with truth and respect. We become the stories we see, read, and hear. Let’s tell better ones.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
#blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #ushistory #americanhistory #media #press #narrative #storytelling #mediabias #oscarssowhite #inclusion #equity #power
  • This #blackhistorymonth post is about narrative power.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    I believe this is one of the best photographs I have ever composed. I shot it in the Fall of 1995 in Washington, D.C. at the Million Man March. It was my first trip back to DC from my freshman year at Harvard, and I had my 35mm camera with me as I always did. The day was positive. I honestly don’t remember the speeches. I remember the fellowship with my fellow Harvard men. I remember the community. I remember the positivity. And I remember seeing this little cluster of unhappy-looking white people assigned to cover the event for the press. I spotted the scene and instinctively captured it.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    Later I took a look and saw something more: people who had been given the power and authority to tell the story of us, but who had physically and emotionally disconnected themselves from our experience and our story. They literally roped themselves off in a tiny area bound by bins labeled “Trash ONLY Please.” This one shot captured generations of news media, Hollywood films, television programming, and more.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    For those of us in communities whose stories get perverted or not told at all, we’ve got to tell our own, and we increasingly have that power. For those granted the power to tell the story of a community different from our own, we’ve got to get close. We’ve got to remove the barriers, physical and metaphorical, if we’re going to have a chance and telling that story with truth and respect. We become the stories we see, read, and hear. Let’s tell better ones.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
    #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #ushistory #americanhistory #media #press #narrative #storytelling #mediabias #oscarssowhite #inclusion #equity #power
  • 70 3 2 hours ago
  • In 1836, the House of Representatives enacted a series of resolutions which automatically tabled any anti-slavery petitions. John Quincy Adams protested the bill by asking if he was being gagged, giving the resolution the nickname the gag law.
Adams recognized that people on all sides of an issue must be free to speak their minds, give voice to uncomfortable ideas, and be heard. He knew what the Founders knew, that government must not forbid or punish citizens for what they say - especially in the House of Representatives. Injustice can be exposed, ideas shared, minds changed, and solutions found when people are free to speak. What do you think you can learn about speaking up from John Quincy Adams?
https://resources.billofrightsinstitute.org/virtues/john-quincy-adams-struggle-slavery-gag-rule/#summary 
#BRInstitute #BRIonlineresource #UShistory #freespeech #weareteachers #educators #teachers #socialstudies #americanportraits
  • In 1836, the House of Representatives enacted a series of resolutions which automatically tabled any anti-slavery petitions. John Quincy Adams protested the bill by asking if he was being gagged, giving the resolution the nickname the gag law.
    Adams recognized that people on all sides of an issue must be free to speak their minds, give voice to uncomfortable ideas, and be heard. He knew what the Founders knew, that government must not forbid or punish citizens for what they say - especially in the House of Representatives. Injustice can be exposed, ideas shared, minds changed, and solutions found when people are free to speak. What do you think you can learn about speaking up from John Quincy Adams?
    https://resources.billofrightsinstitute.org/virtues/john-quincy-adams-struggle-slavery-gag-rule/ #summary
    #BRInstitute #BRIonlineresource #UShistory #freespeech #weareteachers #educators #teachers #socialstudies #americanportraits
  • 13 0 3 hours ago
  • 75 years ago today. 
___
“Holland, the raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next five hundred years.” — James Forrestal
  • 75 years ago today.
    ___
    “Holland, the raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next five hundred years.” — James Forrestal
  • 33 1 3 hours ago
  • #OTD in 1940 – 80 years ago – Folksinger Woody Guthrie wrote "This Land is Your Land" #ushistory 
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/guthrie-writes-this-land-is-your-land
  • #OTD in 1940 – 80 years ago – Folksinger Woody Guthrie wrote "This Land is Your Land" #ushistory
    https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/guthrie-writes-this-land-is-your-land
  • 6 0 3 hours ago
  • Desperation breeds either success or catastrophe in wartime. General George Washington's commitment to cross the Delaware River on Christmas 1776 foreshadowed the many hardships faced as well as the eventual victory of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. At first glance, the decision to transport 2,400 Continental soldiers across an icy river in one night, directly into a severe winter storm of sleet and snow seems irrational.

Washington's decision, however, was based on strategic motivation, understanding that the Continental Army desperately needed a victory after months of intense fighting with several significant defeats and no major victories. Washington also understood that the element of surprise was the only way that he and his army stood a chance of defeating the highly trained Hessian mercenaries. Without this surprise attack at Trenton, it is highly possible that Washington’s Continental Army would not survive and the American Revolution would come to a halt. #mountvernon #georgewashington #americanrevolution #ushistory #crossingthedelaware #militaryhistory #battleoftrenton
  • Desperation breeds either success or catastrophe in wartime. General George Washington's commitment to cross the Delaware River on Christmas 1776 foreshadowed the many hardships faced as well as the eventual victory of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. At first glance, the decision to transport 2,400 Continental soldiers across an icy river in one night, directly into a severe winter storm of sleet and snow seems irrational.

    Washington's decision, however, was based on strategic motivation, understanding that the Continental Army desperately needed a victory after months of intense fighting with several significant defeats and no major victories. Washington also understood that the element of surprise was the only way that he and his army stood a chance of defeating the highly trained Hessian mercenaries. Without this surprise attack at Trenton, it is highly possible that Washington’s Continental Army would not survive and the American Revolution would come to a halt. #mountvernon #georgewashington #americanrevolution #ushistory #crossingthedelaware #militaryhistory #battleoftrenton
  • 2 0 4 hours ago
  • For #BlackHistoryMonth, we remember the #Tuskegee medical trials.⠀
Dr. Kathy-Ann Joseph - of @nyulangone - explains how the trial led many African-Americans to have a lingering mistrust in the U.S. medical system.
  • For #BlackHistoryMonth , we remember the #Tuskegee medical trials.⠀
    Dr. Kathy-Ann Joseph - of @nyulangone - explains how the trial led many African-Americans to have a lingering mistrust in the U.S. medical system.
  • 15 1 4 hours ago
  • Experience the highlights of this incredible adventure across the continent with two installments — one for the trip west and a second for the return journey. #ushistory #historyhighlights
  • Experience the highlights of this incredible adventure across the continent with two installments — one for the trip west and a second for the return journey. #ushistory #historyhighlights
  • 1 0 4 hours ago
  • “Description: Carya glabra, the pignut hickory, is a common, but not abundant species of hickory in the oak-hickory forest association in the Eastern United States and Canada. Other common names are pignut, sweet pignut, coast pignut hickory, smoothbark hickory, swamp hickory, and broom hickory. Wikipedia” Found at Timucuan Nat’l Preserve, Kingsley Plantation, Jacksonville, FL. #florida #slavery #ushistory #arboretum #macro
  • “Description: Carya glabra, the pignut hickory, is a common, but not abundant species of hickory in the oak-hickory forest association in the Eastern United States and Canada. Other common names are pignut, sweet pignut, coast pignut hickory, smoothbark hickory, swamp hickory, and broom hickory. Wikipedia” Found at Timucuan Nat’l Preserve, Kingsley Plantation, Jacksonville, FL. #florida #slavery #ushistory #arboretum #macro
  • 18 0 6 hours ago
  • She’s sees you. She is approaching you. Beware. Proceed with great caution
  • She’s sees you. She is approaching you. Beware. Proceed with great caution
  • 24 1 20 February, 2020