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thephotosociety

thephotosociety The Photo Society— Telling the story behind the stories. We are a collective of over 170 National Geographic photographers.

  • 8.1k posts
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  • Photograph by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety 
Hippo abstract – It really doesn’t matter how many times a particular location has been visited or how many times an animal has been photographed, there is always a new image to be found. This is to me perhaps one of the single most remarkable aspects of the natural world, the simple fact that nature has never finished telling her story and every day she will reveal something new, something remarkable. For photographers such as me this makes our lives so much easier as every day is different and every day is a new adventure. I captured this image a couple of years ago whilst leading photographic tour to the Masai Mara, arguably one of the most astonishing wildlife spectacles to be found anywhere on Earth. A place that has been photographed by millions of photographers, it is easy to miss the subtle in pursuit of the obvious. On this morning we were exploring some secluded river banks looking for the elusive leopards but this moment really caught my eye as we passed by. Little more than a hippo lounging in a muddy stream my eye was drawn immediately to the abstract possibilities, the way that the scene would change as the hippo inhaled and exhaled, his buoyancy altering with every breath, the subtlety of rise and fall. I particularly liked it when there was separation between head and body, or when the topography of his nose was highlighted by the water level. Little details can make all the difference, I preferred it when both his ears were rotated forward whilst the water line on his back revealed the fluctuation in his movement. So let me please ask you all a question. One destination, one species, what is the dream for you. What place is calling to you and do you yearn to see, I would so love to know. For me it would be the polar bear mothers emerging from their winter dens with their new cubs, one day I hope to be so lucky!
  • Photograph by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety
    Hippo abstract – It really doesn’t matter how many times a particular location has been visited or how many times an animal has been photographed, there is always a new image to be found. This is to me perhaps one of the single most remarkable aspects of the natural world, the simple fact that nature has never finished telling her story and every day she will reveal something new, something remarkable. For photographers such as me this makes our lives so much easier as every day is different and every day is a new adventure. I captured this image a couple of years ago whilst leading photographic tour to the Masai Mara, arguably one of the most astonishing wildlife spectacles to be found anywhere on Earth. A place that has been photographed by millions of photographers, it is easy to miss the subtle in pursuit of the obvious. On this morning we were exploring some secluded river banks looking for the elusive leopards but this moment really caught my eye as we passed by. Little more than a hippo lounging in a muddy stream my eye was drawn immediately to the abstract possibilities, the way that the scene would change as the hippo inhaled and exhaled, his buoyancy altering with every breath, the subtlety of rise and fall. I particularly liked it when there was separation between head and body, or when the topography of his nose was highlighted by the water level. Little details can make all the difference, I preferred it when both his ears were rotated forward whilst the water line on his back revealed the fluctuation in his movement. So let me please ask you all a question. One destination, one species, what is the dream for you. What place is calling to you and do you yearn to see, I would so love to know. For me it would be the polar bear mothers emerging from their winter dens with their new cubs, one day I hope to be so lucky!
  • 23,179 108 10 hours ago
  • Photo by Randy Olson //@randyolson | Sudan is the largest country in Africa where millions have died in an insidious conflict between the north and the south… there are nonstop tribal rivalries and wars over resources… human lives exchanged for material goods in some of the most difficult situations I’ve seen in my life. I photographed the war in 2002. When separation happened after the war and it was declared over, I hoped lives would get better… but the killing continued.  Bashir is finally out and I hope this signals promise for the Sudanese people. #sudan
  • Photo by Randy Olson //@randyolson | Sudan is the largest country in Africa where millions have died in an insidious conflict between the north and the south… there are nonstop tribal rivalries and wars over resources… human lives exchanged for material goods in some of the most difficult situations I’ve seen in my life. I photographed the war in 2002. When separation happened after the war and it was declared over, I hoped lives would get better… but the killing continued. Bashir is finally out and I hope this signals promise for the Sudanese people. #sudan
  • 5,677 36 14 hours ago
  • Photo by Stephen Alvarez (@salvarezphoto) | Manitou Cave, Alabama The Cherokee were the only Native American group to develop a written language. Cherokee Syllabary, as the writing is known, was developed by Cherokee leader Sequoyah in the late 1810s. Some of the first examples of Cherokee Syllabary have been discovered in Alabama’s Manitou Cave. This inscription dates from the beginning of the forced relocation of Native Americans known as the Trail of Tears. The inscription is a vivid reminder of how complex Native American culture is. This image was recorded as part of my non profit’s (@ancientartarchive) work in documenting the cave and its inscriptions.
  • Photo by Stephen Alvarez (@salvarezphoto) | Manitou Cave, Alabama The Cherokee were the only Native American group to develop a written language. Cherokee Syllabary, as the writing is known, was developed by Cherokee leader Sequoyah in the late 1810s. Some of the first examples of Cherokee Syllabary have been discovered in Alabama’s Manitou Cave. This inscription dates from the beginning of the forced relocation of Native Americans known as the Trail of Tears. The inscription is a vivid reminder of how complex Native American culture is. This image was recorded as part of my non profit’s (@ancientartarchive) work in documenting the cave and its inscriptions.
  • 6,060 30 18 hours ago
  • Photo by @gerdludwig | On assignment for @natgeo, I entered deeper into the Chernobyl reactor than any other Western photographer. The photograph shows me, all geared up years ago to accompany a group of workers deep into the reactor. Despite wearing oxygen tanks, gas masks and protective suits, the workers were only allowed to work one fifteen-minute shift per day. Since gas masks made photographing impossible, I entered without one. 
As we’re approaching the 33rd anniversary of the world’s largest nuclear accident to date, I am going to post photographs of the aftermath of the Chernobyl catastrophe, from my journeys into the Zone, of the victims and my explorations into the reactor throughout the past three decades on @gerdludwig.

A recent book by Adam Higginbotham, “Midnight in Chernobyl,” gives an amazingly detailed account of the disaster, as well as “a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.” Look out for a new HBO mini-series on Chernobyl, coming May 6.

#Chernobyl #onassignment #nuclear
  • Photo by @gerdludwig | On assignment for @natgeo, I entered deeper into the Chernobyl reactor than any other Western photographer. The photograph shows me, all geared up years ago to accompany a group of workers deep into the reactor. Despite wearing oxygen tanks, gas masks and protective suits, the workers were only allowed to work one fifteen-minute shift per day. Since gas masks made photographing impossible, I entered without one.
    As we’re approaching the 33rd anniversary of the world’s largest nuclear accident to date, I am going to post photographs of the aftermath of the Chernobyl catastrophe, from my journeys into the Zone, of the victims and my explorations into the reactor throughout the past three decades on @gerdludwig.

    A recent book by Adam Higginbotham, “Midnight in Chernobyl,” gives an amazingly detailed account of the disaster, as well as “a powerful investigation into how propaganda, secrecy, and myth have obscured the true story of one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters.” Look out for a new HBO mini-series on Chernobyl, coming May 6.

    #Chernobyl #onassignment #nuclear
  • 4,308 30 23 hours ago
  • Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz  This is one of my best-known images, having gone viral several years ago. I was amused that people in the Middle East assumed it was taken by a spy satellite, while many in Europe and North America guessed it was created in photoshop. The reality is that it was taken by me, circling overhead in my motorized paraglider in a very remote part of Oman, where camel caravans once carried frankincense to the Holy Land. 
To view more of our world from above, follow @geosteinmetz
  • Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz This is one of my best-known images, having gone viral several years ago. I was amused that people in the Middle East assumed it was taken by a spy satellite, while many in Europe and North America guessed it was created in photoshop. The reality is that it was taken by me, circling overhead in my motorized paraglider in a very remote part of Oman, where camel caravans once carried frankincense to the Holy Land.
    To view more of our world from above, follow @geosteinmetz
  • 18,981 109 24 April, 2019
  • Photo by Robbie Shone @shonephoto | Underground in China lies a world that is like no other. China boasts some of the largest and most spectacular caves in the world and we had the honour to explore them and photograph them. Formed over tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of years by dripping water, this giant speleothem stalagmite stands in the center of this giant cave passage. In total darkness it is impossible to grasp the true scale of it, but  throw light around it for a photograph and all is revealed.
  • Photo by Robbie Shone @shonephoto | Underground in China lies a world that is like no other. China boasts some of the largest and most spectacular caves in the world and we had the honour to explore them and photograph them. Formed over tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of years by dripping water, this giant speleothem stalagmite stands in the center of this giant cave passage. In total darkness it is impossible to grasp the true scale of it, but throw light around it for a photograph and all is revealed.
  • 8,802 46 23 April, 2019
  • Photograph by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety 
Mountain hares touching noses – This seemed like an appropriate image to post this Easter weekend and it’s one of my favourite recent images of mountain hares. Having photographed them now for some16 years I never fail to be amazed when I get to witness new aspects of behaviour, behaviours that I’ve never even seen before, let alone photographed. In this instance I was alone on the hill, concealed and freezing cold in a snow-filled ditch I watched as these two hares came running towards me. As tempting as it was to fire the shutter I didn’t want any sound to interrupt their behaviour, I knew from experience that breeding pursuits such as this could often lead to the hare Holy Grail, boxing! They passed by me unnoticed and then, some 10 yards of so behind me they stopped and squared up to one another. That moment was agony for me as I had to try and turn my carcass around in my snow filled ditch, as quickly as I possibly could but not so that my movement caught their eyes and sent them running. Craning my neck to watch them as I contorted myself I felt certain that this was one of those cruel moments, where fate conspires and I get to see, but not photograph, something that I’d always longed to do. Slowly, slowly I turned , my heart racing, my internal dialogue pleading with them to just pause, just wait for a second so that I can get my lens onto them. Something smiled on me that day and they did pause, enabling me to frame the image quite loosely to accommodate any explosive leap. Instead they did this, this impossibly beautiful moment, one of a series of some 20 images that included this ‘kiss’ and then plenty of head rubbing. The natural world is a truly miraculous thing and this remains one of the most beautiful moments that I’ve ever encountered.
  • Photograph by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety
    Mountain hares touching noses – This seemed like an appropriate image to post this Easter weekend and it’s one of my favourite recent images of mountain hares. Having photographed them now for some16 years I never fail to be amazed when I get to witness new aspects of behaviour, behaviours that I’ve never even seen before, let alone photographed. In this instance I was alone on the hill, concealed and freezing cold in a snow-filled ditch I watched as these two hares came running towards me. As tempting as it was to fire the shutter I didn’t want any sound to interrupt their behaviour, I knew from experience that breeding pursuits such as this could often lead to the hare Holy Grail, boxing! They passed by me unnoticed and then, some 10 yards of so behind me they stopped and squared up to one another. That moment was agony for me as I had to try and turn my carcass around in my snow filled ditch, as quickly as I possibly could but not so that my movement caught their eyes and sent them running. Craning my neck to watch them as I contorted myself I felt certain that this was one of those cruel moments, where fate conspires and I get to see, but not photograph, something that I’d always longed to do. Slowly, slowly I turned , my heart racing, my internal dialogue pleading with them to just pause, just wait for a second so that I can get my lens onto them. Something smiled on me that day and they did pause, enabling me to frame the image quite loosely to accommodate any explosive leap. Instead they did this, this impossibly beautiful moment, one of a series of some 20 images that included this ‘kiss’ and then plenty of head rubbing. The natural world is a truly miraculous thing and this remains one of the most beautiful moments that I’ve ever encountered.
  • 24,692 165 23 April, 2019
  • Photo by @joemcnallyphoto.  On this #EarthDay I am reminded of one of the most inspirational dancers I have ever worked with, Rulan Tangen. She is the founding artistic director of @dancing.earth, a wonderful company of indigenous dancers who create an art form, as they state…”our dances are an elemental language of bone and blood memory in motion.” Rulan is wonderful to watch dance as she draws on her own history, an awareness of the earth, and fluidly beautiful gestures to create her art form. A cancer survivor, she used this picture as her announcement to her friends and community that she was recovered and cancer free. It has been a privilege to have her in front of my lens.  #MotivationMonday #MondayMorning #picoftheday
  • Photo by @joemcnallyphoto. On this #EarthDay I am reminded of one of the most inspirational dancers I have ever worked with, Rulan Tangen. She is the founding artistic director of @dancing.earth, a wonderful company of indigenous dancers who create an art form, as they state…”our dances are an elemental language of bone and blood memory in motion.” Rulan is wonderful to watch dance as she draws on her own history, an awareness of the earth, and fluidly beautiful gestures to create her art form. A cancer survivor, she used this picture as her announcement to her friends and community that she was recovered and cancer free. It has been a privilege to have her in front of my lens. #MotivationMonday #MondayMorning #picoftheday
  • 10,039 49 22 April, 2019
  • Photo by @paoloverzone // The Svalbard Church located in Longyearbyen, is the world's northernmost church. The first church at Longyearbyen was consecrated on August 28, 1921. During World War II, it was bombed, and the church burned down. In 1956, the foundation stone for the new church was laid down. Every time I was in Svalbard I took the time to visit this nice church. @thephotosociety #arctic #longyearbyen #svalbard  #climatechange 
Follow me @paoloverzone for more photos and stories
  • Photo by @paoloverzone // The Svalbard Church located in Longyearbyen, is the world's northernmost church. The first church at Longyearbyen was consecrated on August 28, 1921. During World War II, it was bombed, and the church burned down. In 1956, the foundation stone for the new church was laid down. Every time I was in Svalbard I took the time to visit this nice church. @thephotosociety #arctic #longyearbyen #svalbard #climatechange
    Follow me @paoloverzone for more photos and stories
  • 11,626 44 22 April, 2019
  • Photo by Robbie Shone @shonephoto | The spiritual land of China is all encompassing. This photograph was captured close to the Tibetan border. We had slept out under the stars whilst traveling almost nomadically following an expedition to explore a giant cave system in the municipality of Chongqing. Seeing this wondrous sight at the start of a new day was a great way to unwind.
  • Photo by Robbie Shone @shonephoto | The spiritual land of China is all encompassing. This photograph was captured close to the Tibetan border. We had slept out under the stars whilst traveling almost nomadically following an expedition to explore a giant cave system in the municipality of Chongqing. Seeing this wondrous sight at the start of a new day was a great way to unwind.
  • 15,494 52 21 April, 2019