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  • Few individuals have enjoyed more of an influence of #American politics than David Koch, whose death at 79 was announced on Aug. 23, even though he never held public office in his life. As correspondent Philip Elliott writes, Koch was a hard-edged ideologue who took once-fringe ideas of his father’s John Birch Society to the mainstream by dint of his checkbook and cold-eyed disdain of what he saw as limits to freedom. As the nascent Tea Party movement started stirring in the late 2000s, it was David Koch who saw the potential to use his family’s already formidable network of deep-pocketed allies to tap into the nation’s frustrations through groups like Americans for Prosperity. In doing so, he became perhaps the most prominent and vilified symbol of the billionaires who have turned 21st century politics into a playground of the privileged. His critics say he and his family’s network of donors and groups coarsened #politics during Barack Obama’s presidency to the point that Donald #Trump was able to win the Republican nomination in 2016, despite the fact both David and brother Charles both found Trump personally and politically abhorrent. But unlike others in his ranks, Koch had one of the freest wallets for charities of his choosing: his lifetime philanthropic giving topped $1 billion. Like all giants in a society, his legacy is unwieldy and full of contradictions that defy a simple reading. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @kristaschlueter—@nytimes/@reduxpictures
  • Few individuals have enjoyed more of an influence of #American politics than David Koch, whose death at 79 was announced on Aug. 23, even though he never held public office in his life. As correspondent Philip Elliott writes, Koch was a hard-edged ideologue who took once-fringe ideas of his father’s John Birch Society to the mainstream by dint of his checkbook and cold-eyed disdain of what he saw as limits to freedom. As the nascent Tea Party movement started stirring in the late 2000s, it was David Koch who saw the potential to use his family’s already formidable network of deep-pocketed allies to tap into the nation’s frustrations through groups like Americans for Prosperity. In doing so, he became perhaps the most prominent and vilified symbol of the billionaires who have turned 21st century politics into a playground of the privileged. His critics say he and his family’s network of donors and groups coarsened #politics during Barack Obama’s presidency to the point that Donald #Trump was able to win the Republican nomination in 2016, despite the fact both David and brother Charles both found Trump personally and politically abhorrent. But unlike others in his ranks, Koch had one of the freest wallets for charities of his choosing: his lifetime philanthropic giving topped $1 billion. Like all giants in a society, his legacy is unwieldy and full of contradictions that defy a simple reading. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @kristaschlueter@nytimes/@reduxpictures
  • 6,688 0 17 hours ago
  • How does one measure the greatness of a place—in miles covered, dollars spent, or visitors captivated? Such metrics can play a part, but also important is something that many travelers aspire to experience: the sense that one has stumbled upon the extraordinary. To compile our second annual list of the World’s Greatest Places, this week's International cover, TIME solicited nominations across a variety of categories—including #museums, parks, restaurants, and #hotels—from our editors and correspondents around the world as well as industry experts. Then we evaluated each one based on key factors, including quality, originality, sustainability, #innovation and influence. The result: 100 new and newly noteworthy destinations to experience right now, from #America’s hottest hometown pizzeria to a #Tokyo museum bringing digital #art to life. See the full list at the link in bio. Illustration by @petergreenwooduk for TIME
  • How does one measure the greatness of a place—in miles covered, dollars spent, or visitors captivated? Such metrics can play a part, but also important is something that many travelers aspire to experience: the sense that one has stumbled upon the extraordinary. To compile our second annual list of the World’s Greatest Places, this week's International cover, TIME solicited nominations across a variety of categories—including #museums , parks, restaurants, and #hotels —from our editors and correspondents around the world as well as industry experts. Then we evaluated each one based on key factors, including quality, originality, sustainability, #innovation and influence. The result: 100 new and newly noteworthy destinations to experience right now, from #America ’s hottest hometown pizzeria to a #Tokyo museum bringing digital #art to life. See the full list at the link in bio. Illustration by @petergreenwooduk for TIME
  • 16,445 0 23 hours ago
  • A fight is brewing between #Brazil and #Europe over the lungs of the planet. Since taking office in January, Brazil’s far-right President Jair #Bolsonaro has overseen a surge in logging in the vast #Amazon rain forest, where a record number of fires are currently burning. Bolsonaro has delivered on campaign promises to weaken protections for the environment and #indigenous communities, freeing up more land for cattle. On Aug. 15, Norway suspended a $33 million donation to a Brazilian #sustainability fund because Bolsonaro had interfered in it; Germany froze its payment five days earlier. Bolsonaro responded with mockery, telling the Europeans to go “reforest Germany” instead. Before that, on July 29, he canceled a climate-policy meeting with France’s Foreign Minister in order to get a haircut. Unlike the Amazon, the obstacles to #climate action show no sign of shrinking. In this photograph, smoke billows from a fire near Porto Velho on Aug. 21. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @uesleimarcelinooficial—@reuters
  • A fight is brewing between #Brazil and #Europe over the lungs of the planet. Since taking office in January, Brazil’s far-right President Jair #Bolsonaro has overseen a surge in logging in the vast #Amazon rain forest, where a record number of fires are currently burning. Bolsonaro has delivered on campaign promises to weaken protections for the environment and #indigenous communities, freeing up more land for cattle. On Aug. 15, Norway suspended a $33 million donation to a Brazilian #sustainability fund because Bolsonaro had interfered in it; Germany froze its payment five days earlier. Bolsonaro responded with mockery, telling the Europeans to go “reforest Germany” instead. Before that, on July 29, he canceled a climate-policy meeting with France’s Foreign Minister in order to get a haircut. Unlike the Amazon, the obstacles to #climate action show no sign of shrinking. In this photograph, smoke billows from a fire near Porto Velho on Aug. 21. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @uesleimarcelinooficial@reuters
  • 39,417 0 22 August, 2019
  • In the long, final days of #summer, business at Broad Street Diner in #Philadelphia has been slow. Christina Munce, a single #mother who has worked there as a #waitress for more than eight years and relies on tips, tries to stay positive. The customers and staff are her family, more or less, and not just because her sister, Jeanne, is also a waitress there. For Munce, it all adds up: the freebies, the walkouts, the cops receiving a 50% discount, the mess-ups from the kitchen—each one a knock to her take-home pay. “I am a people person. But at the end of the day, your compliments and smiles are not enough,” she says during one of her shifts. She tells her daughter that #education is the most important thing, that she needs to get good grades, no matter what. “I say, ‘I just want you to be better than me,'” she tells TIME. Not that she’d steer her daughter away from waitressing, necessarily. If you’re a people person, Munce says, it can be fun to talk to strangers all day. Depending on them for tips, though, is something else. Read the full story—published in partnership with The Fuller Project, a non-profit newsroom that reports on issues impacting #women—at the link in bio. Photographs by @sashafoto for TIME
  • In the long, final days of #summer , business at Broad Street Diner in #Philadelphia has been slow. Christina Munce, a single #mother who has worked there as a #waitress for more than eight years and relies on tips, tries to stay positive. The customers and staff are her family, more or less, and not just because her sister, Jeanne, is also a waitress there. For Munce, it all adds up: the freebies, the walkouts, the cops receiving a 50% discount, the mess-ups from the kitchen—each one a knock to her take-home pay. “I am a people person. But at the end of the day, your compliments and smiles are not enough,” she says during one of her shifts. She tells her daughter that #education is the most important thing, that she needs to get good grades, no matter what. “I say, ‘I just want you to be better than me,'” she tells TIME. Not that she’d steer her daughter away from waitressing, necessarily. If you’re a people person, Munce says, it can be fun to talk to strangers all day. Depending on them for tips, though, is something else. Read the full story—published in partnership with The Fuller Project, a non-profit newsroom that reports on issues impacting #women —at the link in bio. Photographs by @sashafoto for TIME
  • 7,761 0 22 August, 2019
  • Christina Munce, 32, didn’t plan to be a #waitress. She was in school studying massage therapy when, at 21, she got pregnant, and started waiting tables to put away the cash she would need as a young #mother. She doesn’t regret a thing—her daughter, now 11, is her whole world. But being a single parent has limited Munce’s job options, since she needs the flexibility to take care of her daughter. After eight years working at the 24-hour Broad Street Diner in #Philadelphia, Munce mostly gets the shifts that she wants—working breakfast and lunch and leaving by 3 p.m. when her daughter gets out of school—so for that, she’s grateful. But she also feels the weight of a low, unpredictable wage: Munce relies on tips to live. She works eight-hour shifts for $2.83 an hour; her tips are supposed to get her to $7.25 an hour, but they often don’t. “I have to make sure that my daughter has a roof over her head,” she says. Half a century ago, people like Munce without a college education could expect to make a middle-class wage. But in recent years, as male-dominated manufacturing jobs have been outsourced or automated, #women are contributing more to their families’ paychecks, and more of the 40% of Americans with no more than a high school #education are being pushed into the service sector—as waitresses, domestic workers, hairdressers and @uber drivers. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @sashafoto for TIME
  • Christina Munce, 32, didn’t plan to be a #waitress . She was in school studying massage therapy when, at 21, she got pregnant, and started waiting tables to put away the cash she would need as a young #mother . She doesn’t regret a thing—her daughter, now 11, is her whole world. But being a single parent has limited Munce’s job options, since she needs the flexibility to take care of her daughter. After eight years working at the 24-hour Broad Street Diner in #Philadelphia , Munce mostly gets the shifts that she wants—working breakfast and lunch and leaving by 3 p.m. when her daughter gets out of school—so for that, she’s grateful. But she also feels the weight of a low, unpredictable wage: Munce relies on tips to live. She works eight-hour shifts for $2.83 an hour; her tips are supposed to get her to $7.25 an hour, but they often don’t. “I have to make sure that my daughter has a roof over her head,” she says. Half a century ago, people like Munce without a college education could expect to make a middle-class wage. But in recent years, as male-dominated manufacturing jobs have been outsourced or automated, #women are contributing more to their families’ paychecks, and more of the 40% of Americans with no more than a high school #education are being pushed into the service sector—as waitresses, domestic workers, hairdressers and @uber drivers. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @sashafoto for TIME
  • 14,334 0 22 August, 2019
  • Low wages, sexual harassment and unreliable tips. This is life in #America’s booming service industry. The decade-long economic expansion has been a boon to those at the top of the economic ladder. But it left millions of workers behind, particularly the 4.4 million who rely on tips to earn a living, fully two-thirds of them #women. Even as wages have crept up—if slowly—in other sectors of the economy, the minimum wage for waitresses and other tipped workers hasn’t budged since 1991. Indeed, there is an entirely separate federal minimum wage for those who live on tips. It varies by state from as low as $2.13 (the federal tipped minimum wage) in 17 states including #Texas, #Nebraska and #Virginia, up to $9.35 in #Hawaii. In 36 states, the tipped minimum wage is under $5 an hour. Legally, employers are supposed to make up the difference when tips don’t get servers to the minimum wage, but some #restaurants don’t track this closely and the law is rarely enforced. Waitresses are emblematic of the type of job expected to grow most in the #American economy in the next decade—low-wage service work with no guaranteed hours or income. Read the full story—published in partnership with The Fuller Project, a non-profit newsroom that reports on issues impacting women—at the link in bio. Photograph by Sasha Arutyunova (@sashafoto) for TIME
  • Low wages, sexual harassment and unreliable tips. This is life in #America ’s booming service industry. The decade-long economic expansion has been a boon to those at the top of the economic ladder. But it left millions of workers behind, particularly the 4.4 million who rely on tips to earn a living, fully two-thirds of them #women . Even as wages have crept up—if slowly—in other sectors of the economy, the minimum wage for waitresses and other tipped workers hasn’t budged since 1991. Indeed, there is an entirely separate federal minimum wage for those who live on tips. It varies by state from as low as $2.13 (the federal tipped minimum wage) in 17 states including #Texas , #Nebraska and #Virginia , up to $9.35 in #Hawaii . In 36 states, the tipped minimum wage is under $5 an hour. Legally, employers are supposed to make up the difference when tips don’t get servers to the minimum wage, but some #restaurants don’t track this closely and the law is rarely enforced. Waitresses are emblematic of the type of job expected to grow most in the #American economy in the next decade—low-wage service work with no guaranteed hours or income. Read the full story—published in partnership with The Fuller Project, a non-profit newsroom that reports on issues impacting women—at the link in bio. Photograph by Sasha Arutyunova (@sashafoto) for TIME
  • 17,743 0 22 August, 2019
  • A large iceberg floats away as the sun sets near Kulusuk, #Greenland, on Aug. 15. Scientists are hard at work there, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice amid record-shattering heat. From July 31 to Aug. 3, the Associated Press reports, more than 58 billion tons (53 billion metric tons) of ice melted there. That's more than 40 billion tons above the average for this time of year. By the end of the summer, scientists estimate that some 440 billion tons (400 billion metric tons) of ice (or more) will have either melted or broken off Greenland's giant ice sheet. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @felipedana—@apnews
  • A large iceberg floats away as the sun sets near Kulusuk, #Greenland , on Aug. 15. Scientists are hard at work there, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice amid record-shattering heat. From July 31 to Aug. 3, the Associated Press reports, more than 58 billion tons (53 billion metric tons) of ice melted there. That's more than 40 billion tons above the average for this time of year. By the end of the summer, scientists estimate that some 440 billion tons (400 billion metric tons) of ice (or more) will have either melted or broken off Greenland's giant ice sheet. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @felipedana@apnews
  • 37,340 0 20 August, 2019
  • For a lot of reasons, @lilnasx didn’t initially plan to come out. He had been taught from a young age that homosexuality “is never going to be O.K.,” and he feared he would lose fans. While #hiphop stars like Frank Ocean (@blonded) and Tyler, the Creator (@feliciathegoat) have come out as #queer, the spectre of homophobia still looms large. But during #Pride Month, reports Andrew R. Chow, something changed for Lil Nas. “I never would have done that if I wasn’t in a way pushed by the universe,” he says. “In June, I’m seeing Pride flags everywhere and seeing couples holding hands—little stuff like that.” He first came out to his father and sister earlier in June, and then broke the news on Twitter several weeks later. It was a historic moment, in no small part because of how casually he went about it: “Thought I made it obvious,” he tweeted, pointing out a rainbow on his album cover. He had some haters, but they were quickly and summarily dismissed—often by him personally. Meanwhile, “Old Town Road” continued to rack up millions of streams, extending its run atop the Billboard Hot 100. Now Lil Nas’ playful expression of his sexuality is just another part of his self-deprecating online brand. “Last year i was sleeping on my sisters floor, had no money, struggling to get plays on my music, suffering from daily headaches, now i’m gay,” he tweeted at the end of July. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @kelianne for TIME
  • For a lot of reasons, @lilnasx didn’t initially plan to come out. He had been taught from a young age that homosexuality “is never going to be O.K.,” and he feared he would lose fans. While #hiphop stars like Frank Ocean (@blonded) and Tyler, the Creator (@feliciathegoat) have come out as #queer , the spectre of homophobia still looms large. But during #Pride Month, reports Andrew R. Chow, something changed for Lil Nas. “I never would have done that if I wasn’t in a way pushed by the universe,” he says. “In June, I’m seeing Pride flags everywhere and seeing couples holding hands—little stuff like that.” He first came out to his father and sister earlier in June, and then broke the news on Twitter several weeks later. It was a historic moment, in no small part because of how casually he went about it: “Thought I made it obvious,” he tweeted, pointing out a rainbow on his album cover. He had some haters, but they were quickly and summarily dismissed—often by him personally. Meanwhile, “Old Town Road” continued to rack up millions of streams, extending its run atop the Billboard Hot 100. Now Lil Nas’ playful expression of his sexuality is just another part of his self-deprecating online brand. “Last year i was sleeping on my sisters floor, had no money, struggling to get plays on my music, suffering from daily headaches, now i’m gay,” he tweeted at the end of July. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @kelianne for TIME
  • 23,924 0 19 August, 2019
  • A wedding hall filled with hundreds of well-wishers became the site of this year's deadliest attack in #Afghanistan's capital, @apnews reports, following the Aug. 17 blast by a suicide bomber that left at least 63 dead and 182 wounded. The attack at the Dubai City wedding hall in #Kabul, reported to have occurred near the stage where musicians were playing, was claimed by a local Islamic State affiliate. It came as the U.S. and Taliban are holding tense but cordial peace negotiations after 18 years of war. Photographs by Mohammad Ismail—@reuters
  • A wedding hall filled with hundreds of well-wishers became the site of this year's deadliest attack in #Afghanistan 's capital, @apnews reports, following the Aug. 17 blast by a suicide bomber that left at least 63 dead and 182 wounded. The attack at the Dubai City wedding hall in #Kabul , reported to have occurred near the stage where musicians were playing, was claimed by a local Islamic State affiliate. It came as the U.S. and Taliban are holding tense but cordial peace negotiations after 18 years of war. Photographs by Mohammad Ismail—@reuters
  • 15,452 0 18 August, 2019
  • Hong Kong’s eleventh straight weekend of antigovernment protests culminated in a large rally at the city’s Victoria Park on Aug. 18. Tens of thousands chanted “Free Hong Kong! Democracy Now!” and “Fight for freedom! Stand for Hong Kong!” as a heavy rain fell. Many at the #protest carried banners decrying alleged police brutality and what they claim is collusion between law enforcement and criminal gangs known as triads. There were no major street battles or arrests, to the considerable relief of many in the restive enclave. By the middle of Sunday afternoon, large numbers of protesters defied a police order and began streaming from #VictoriaPark towards the central business district. The sheer number of marchers overwhelmed major roads and brought parts of downtown #HongKong to a virtual standstill. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
  • Hong Kong’s eleventh straight weekend of antigovernment protests culminated in a large rally at the city’s Victoria Park on Aug. 18. Tens of thousands chanted “Free Hong Kong! Democracy Now!” and “Fight for freedom! Stand for Hong Kong!” as a heavy rain fell. Many at the #protest carried banners decrying alleged police brutality and what they claim is collusion between law enforcement and criminal gangs known as triads. There were no major street battles or arrests, to the considerable relief of many in the restive enclave. By the middle of Sunday afternoon, large numbers of protesters defied a police order and began streaming from #VictoriaPark towards the central business district. The sheer number of marchers overwhelmed major roads and brought parts of downtown #HongKong to a virtual standstill. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @adamfergusonstudio for TIME
  • 78,341 0 18 August, 2019
  • Pigeon competitions and award-winning potatoes are just some of the highlights at the #Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18 in Des Moines. Not to mention all the Democratic presidential candidates, which are trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the Iowa caucus in February 2020. In these photographs: potatoes are displayed on Aug. 10; a boom mic is seen above the fray as @pete.buttigieg greets fair-goers on Aug. 13; an overflowing trash can; people look up as Buttigieg rides the Sky Glider; and Jett Thomas, 17, holds his 2.1-pound pigeon after judging in the Heaviest and Lightest Pigeon Contest on Aug. 12. (It's not his first win.) See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @mscottbrauer for TIME
  • Pigeon competitions and award-winning potatoes are just some of the highlights at the #Iowa State Fair, which kicked off Aug. 8 and will wrap up on Aug. 18 in Des Moines. Not to mention all the Democratic presidential candidates, which are trying to foster connections with voters ahead of the Iowa caucus in February 2020. In these photographs: potatoes are displayed on Aug. 10; a boom mic is seen above the fray as @pete.buttigieg greets fair-goers on Aug. 13; an overflowing trash can; people look up as Buttigieg rides the Sky Glider; and Jett Thomas, 17, holds his 2.1-pound pigeon after judging in the Heaviest and Lightest Pigeon Contest on Aug. 12. (It's not his first win.) See more pictures at the link in bio. Photographs by @mscottbrauer for TIME
  • 9,542 0 17 August, 2019
  • Ever since @LIFE magazine’s 20th anniversary commemorative edition revealed they were on the cover of Atlantic Records’ original 1970 Woodstock: Music from the Original Soundtrack and More, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline have been telling the story of how they met. It happened in February 1969 when Nick was a 20-year-old bartender at Dino’s, in Middletown, N.Y., and Bobbi, then 19, was dating a waiter there. That Memorial Day Weekend, when the waiter went to the Jersey Shore for a guys trip without telling Bobbi, Nick invited her to go to pizza and a movie. A few months later, they were at #Woodstock. Photographer Burk Uzzle has recalled walking around looking for a good shot and seeing the couple stand up and hug, kiss and smile at each other, before Bobbi leaned her head on Nick’s shoulder. "These beautiful people live on, decade after decade," he says now, "and while showing us their #love from within a muddy blanket, have created a legacy of hope for a better world." See more pictures—and hear from the photographers on the festival images that moved them most—at the link in bio. Photograph by Burk Uzzle
  • Ever since @LIFE magazine’s 20th anniversary commemorative edition revealed they were on the cover of Atlantic Records’ original 1970 Woodstock: Music from the Original Soundtrack and More, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline have been telling the story of how they met. It happened in February 1969 when Nick was a 20-year-old bartender at Dino’s, in Middletown, N.Y., and Bobbi, then 19, was dating a waiter there. That Memorial Day Weekend, when the waiter went to the Jersey Shore for a guys trip without telling Bobbi, Nick invited her to go to pizza and a movie. A few months later, they were at #Woodstock . Photographer Burk Uzzle has recalled walking around looking for a good shot and seeing the couple stand up and hug, kiss and smile at each other, before Bobbi leaned her head on Nick’s shoulder. "These beautiful people live on, decade after decade," he says now, "and while showing us their #love from within a muddy blanket, have created a legacy of hope for a better world." See more pictures—and hear from the photographers on the festival images that moved them most—at the link in bio. Photograph by Burk Uzzle
  • 24,593 0 16 August, 2019